Schlagwort-Archive: Mitte

Nice Restaurants Mitte Berlin photos

Some cool restaurants mitte berlin images:

1 – von Duesseldorf nach Berlin
restaurants mitte berlin
Image by TijsB
I had arranged a ride to Berlin through Mitfahrgelegenheit.de. Stephan Roessler was our driver, he had rented a big car and offered a ride for 6 people. plus we picked up two more persons in Wuppertal. I was sitting next to a couple with a pretty hard life. The girl had MS since a few months, she was not able to walk or work anymore. Her boyfriend had quit his job to be able to take care of her and the household. Now they went for a visit of her family in Brandenburg. In Berlin we were dropped near Zoologischer Garten. i wade a walk along Kurfuerstenstrasse and surroundings before heading to my host Rolf Knuth. Rolf is a very shy, handsome and very friendly man, the same age like me, living in Prenzlauer berg (Dunckerstrasse). His house has a large living where he usually sleeps and it’s is a cosy mess with letters and other papers everywhere. He offered me his bed as he would sleep with his boyfriend Detlef in Kreuzberg. We walked to Mitte and had dinner in a Thai restaurant near the Volksbuehne where Detlef accompanied us.

Oranienburg
restaurants mitte berlin
Image by IK’s World Trip
More views from Oranienburg. Looks good, butI don’t recommend. I walked about 1 km from restaurant to the S-Bahn station, and was proposed by 5 streetwalkers.

Nice Berlin Mitte Wohnung photos

A few nice berlin mitte wohnung images I found:

Das frühere Postfuhramt
berlin mitte wohnung
Image by Gertrud K.
Ecke Oranienburger und Tucholskystraße, Berlin

Nach einem Entwurf von Carl Schwatlo errichtete, zwischen 1875 und 1881, Postbaurat Wilhelm Tuckermann das Postfuhramt als imposantes dreigeschossiges Eckgebäude mit markantem, achteckigen Kuppelbau. Es war seinerzeit eines der größten Behördenbauwerke in Berlin. Im Laufe der Zeit beherbergte es verschiedene Abteilungen der Post.

Das Gebäude wurde im Krieg stark beschädigt. 1973 begannen erste, kleinere Wiederherstellungsarbeiten. Nach weiteren Arbeiten an verschiedenen Teilbereichen – die Hoffassade des Flügels an der Oranienburger Straße wurde stark vereinfacht wiederhergestellt – erfolgte schließlich zwischen 1986 und 1989 die Restaurierung des Eckgebäudeteils einschließlich Turm und Kuppeln.

Der Postbetrieb wurde 1995 endgültig eingestellt. Zwischen 1997 und 2001 fanden in den Räumen des Postfuhramtes wechselnde Ausstellungen statt. 2005 wurde das Grundstück an einen Investor verkauft. Der neue Eigentümer der Immobilie, die israelische Investorengruppe Elad, errichtet dort unter anderem ein Hotel und Wohnungen. (Wikipedia)

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Cool Hotels Berlin Mitte Friedrichstraße images

Some cool hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße images:

Friedrichstraße 019
hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße
Image by lilli2de
Hotels, Ärztehaus, Shoppingmile

Rio Spree / Spree River
hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße
Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura
Estação de trem urbano (S-Bahn) Friederichstrasse.

The Friedrichstraße (lit. Frederick Street) is a major culture and shopping street in central Berlin, forming the core of the Friedrichstadt neighborhood. It runs from the northern part of the old Mitte district (north of which it is called Chausseestraße) to the Hallesches Tor in the district of Kreuzberg. Due to its north-southerly direction, it forms important junctions with the east-western axes, most notably with Leipziger Straße and Unter den Linden. The U6 U-Bahn line runs underneath. During the Cold War it was bisected by the Berlin Wall and was the location of Checkpoint Charlie.

As central Berlin’s traditional shopping street, Friedrichstraße is three blocks east of the parallel Wilhelmstraße, the historic heart of the old government quarter (Regierungsviertel) until 1945.

The Friedrichstraße was badly damaged during World War II and only partly rebuilt during the division of Berlin. The section in West Berlin was partly rebuilt as a residential street; in the late 1960s, the remains of the former Belle-Alliance-Platz at the end of the Friedrichstraße, renamed Mehringplatz, were completely demolished and replaced with a concrete housing and office development designed by Hans Scharoun. Despite its central location, this area remains relatively poor.

In the East Berlin section, plans were put into place to widen the street to four lanes as was done to the Leipziger Straße; the Hotel Unter den Linden (demolished 2006) and the original Lindencorso (demolished 1991) were the only structures built during this time with the wider profile of the street in mind. The Grand Hotel Berlin, East Germany’s top 5-star hotel, was built across from the Hotel Unter den Linden in 1987. Further plans were drawn up for a rebuilding of the street, and construction was well underway at the time of German reunification in 1990, when the East German Plattenbau-based construction was stopped and subsequently demolished; only a few buildings that were already complete and occupied were spared. The completed Berlin Casino building located at the corner of Leipziger Straße was torn down in 1994.

Friedrichstraße was rebuilt in the 1990s, and at the time it was the city’s largest construction project; work continues north of Friedrichstraße station. A number of well-known architects contributed to the plans, including Jean Nouvel, who designed the Galeries Lafayette department store and Philip Johnson, who created the American Business Center at Checkpoint Charlie. The redevelopment received mixed reviews, but the street once again became a popular shopping destination.

During the Cold War and division of Berlin, the Friedrichstraße underground station, despite being located in East Berlin, was utilized by two intersecting West Berlin S-Bahn lines and the West Berlin subway line U6. The station served as a transfer point for these lines, and trains stopped there, although all other stations on these lines in East Berlin were sealed-off ghost stations (Geisterbahnhof), where trains passed through under guard without stopping. At Friedrichstraße station, West Berlin passengers could transfer from one platform to another but could not leave the station without the appropriate papers. The section of the station open to West Berlin lines was heavily guarded and was sealed off from the smaller part of it serving as a terminus of the East Berlin S-Bahn and as a station for long-distance trains.
Wikipedia

Die Friedrichstraße liegt in den Berliner Ortsteilen Mitte und Kreuzberg. Sie ist eine der bekanntesten Straßen im östlichen Zentrum Berlins und wurde nach dem Kurfürsten Friedrich III. von Brandenburg benannt. Dieser regierte von 1688 bis 1713 und war ab 1701 als Friedrich I. König in Preußen.
Wikipedia

Cool Hotelzimmer Berlin Mitte images

Some cool hotelzimmer berlin mitte images:

2014-09-28_0654_UK_Berlin_060x
hotelzimmer berlin mitte
Image by Uwe.Koch
Wochenendreise nach Berlin
anläßlich Dennis‘ Teilnahme
am 41. BMW-Berlin-Marathon

Blick aus Hotelzimmer 628
ibis Berlin Mitte

2014-09-28_0728_UK_Berlin_063x
hotelzimmer berlin mitte
Image by Uwe.Koch
Wochenendreise nach Berlin
anläßlich Dennis‘ Teilnahme
am 41. BMW-Berlin-Marathon

Blick aus Hotelzimmer 628
ibis Berlin Mitte

2014-09-27_1311_UK_Berlin_008x
hotelzimmer berlin mitte
Image by Uwe.Koch
Wochenendreise nach Berlin
anläßlich Dennis‘ Teilnahme
am 41. BMW-Berlin-Marathon

Blick aus dem Hotelzimmer 628
des ibis Berlin Mitte

Nice Tourist Information Berlin Mitte photos

Some cool tourist information berlin mitte images:

Holocaust exhibit #7
tourist information berlin mitte
Image by Ed Yourdon
The Holocaust exhibit, officially known as the “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe” (”Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas” in German), is a memorial in the center of Berlin dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. It consists of a 4.7-acre site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The slabs are 7 ft 10 in long, 3 ft 1 in wide, and they vary in height from 7.9 in to 15 ft 9.0 in. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west—at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims. Building of the exhibit began on April 1, 2003, and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate.

I had never heard of the exhibit before I arrived; and because I am neither Jewish nor German, I had no idea what to expect. But I can tell you that it is one of the most somber, powerful, and moving exhibits I have ever seen. It was difficult for me to photograph — not because of any technical complexities, but because I had a difficult time keeping my hands from shaking as I took the photos.

**********************************
For the final few days of our vacation, we traveled by air from Amsterdam to Berlin — and spent about four days in the “Mitte” section of the city, quite close to what was once the dividing line between East and West Berlin; indeed, our hotel was technically in East Berlin.

We spent the first afternoon wandering around the local area, partly to see the infamous “Checkpoint Charlie” (just a few blocks from our hotel), and partly to get a sense of the buildings, the people, and the overall “look and feel” of the city. Since I spend much of my time focusing on “street photography” in New York, I did the same thing here … and aside from the German language that you’ll see on a few of the signposts, the people look much the same as they do in any other big city.

I did get a few photos of the Brandenburg Gate and the Holocaust Exhibition, and some video clips from inside the TierGarten (which I’ll upload in the next few days). I also took quite a few photos of some “street art” that was created on one of the few remaining sections of the old Berlin Wall; these two will be uploaded in the next few days.

We took a driving tour around the city one morning, including a quick circle around the old 1936 Olympic Stadium; we also had lunch in a fancy restaurant atop the old Reichstag Building, which is now (as I understand it) the home of the German legislature. But I certainly don’t feel that I saw very much of the entire city; it would be like making a whirlwind tour around a few parts of Manhattan, and then trying to claim that you’ve seen all of New York City.

As a child of the Cold War (and having been born exactly one year befor the day that Hitler committed suicide), I have always been intrigued by Berlin — and would love to go back several more times to see more of the neighborhoods, the culture, and the people. I don’t think I would ever claim to “know” Berlin in any complete sense; indeed, I don’t even feel that way about New York, after living here for 45+ years. But I could certainly learn a lot more, and I found it sufficiently interesting that I would like to learn more…

**********************************

During the first two weeks of September 2015, we took a river cruise down the Rhine River, and wrapped up the trip with a few days in Berlin. This Flickr album contains various photos from that trip …

We spent the first couple days recovering from jet-lag in Interlaken, Switzerland. This is the site of the Jungfrau and various other spectacular peaks in the Alps range — but it was so foggy that we could hardly see anything. I’ve included a couple of videos of a tram ride down the mountain, as well as some paraglider who floated down into the town park.

We then traveled to Bern, where we got on-board a Viking Cruise ship that headed north for the next several days — eventually arriving in Amsterdam, after making stops nearly every day to see ancient castles and fortresses, as well as various villages and small towns that have survived various wars, tyrants, and regimes for well over a thousand years.

From our final cruise destination in Amsterdam, we flew to Berlin — where we spent a few days at a very nice hotel that turned out to be in what was once East Berlin. Indeed, the separation between East and West Berlin, once so obvious and important, is now almost impossible for a visitor to spot. Except for some rubble, and a few small mementoes (like Checkpoint Charlie, a few blocks from our hotel), there is no obvious difference between East and West from pre-1989 days.

Holocaust exhibit #5
tourist information berlin mitte
Image by Ed Yourdon
The Holocaust exhibit, officially known as the “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe” (”Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas” in German), is a memorial in the center of Berlin dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. It consists of a 4.7-acre site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The slabs are 7 ft 10 in long, 3 ft 1 in wide, and they vary in height from 7.9 in to 15 ft 9.0 in. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west—at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims. Building of the exhibit began on April 1, 2003, and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate.

I had never heard of the exhibit before I arrived; and because I am neither Jewish nor German, I had no idea what to expect. But I can tell you that it is one of the most somber, powerful, and moving exhibits I have ever seen. It was difficult for me to photograph — not because of any technical complexities, but because I had a difficult time keeping my hands from shaking as I took the photos.

**********************************
For the final few days of our vacation, we traveled by air from Amsterdam to Berlin — and spent about four days in the “Mitte” section of the city, quite close to what was once the dividing line between East and West Berlin; indeed, our hotel was technically in East Berlin.

We spent the first afternoon wandering around the local area, partly to see the infamous “Checkpoint Charlie” (just a few blocks from our hotel), and partly to get a sense of the buildings, the people, and the overall “look and feel” of the city. Since I spend much of my time focusing on “street photography” in New York, I did the same thing here … and aside from the German language that you’ll see on a few of the signposts, the people look much the same as they do in any other big city.

I did get a few photos of the Brandenburg Gate and the Holocaust Exhibition, and some video clips from inside the TierGarten (which I’ll upload in the next few days). I also took quite a few photos of some “street art” that was created on one of the few remaining sections of the old Berlin Wall; these two will be uploaded in the next few days.

We took a driving tour around the city one morning, including a quick circle around the old 1936 Olympic Stadium; we also had lunch in a fancy restaurant atop the old Reichstag Building, which is now (as I understand it) the home of the German legislature. But I certainly don’t feel that I saw very much of the entire city; it would be like making a whirlwind tour around a few parts of Manhattan, and then trying to claim that you’ve seen all of New York City.

As a child of the Cold War (and having been born exactly one year befor the day that Hitler committed suicide), I have always been intrigued by Berlin — and would love to go back several more times to see more of the neighborhoods, the culture, and the people. I don’t think I would ever claim to “know” Berlin in any complete sense; indeed, I don’t even feel that way about New York, after living here for 45+ years. But I could certainly learn a lot more, and I found it sufficiently interesting that I would like to learn more…

**********************************

During the first two weeks of September 2015, we took a river cruise down the Rhine River, and wrapped up the trip with a few days in Berlin. This Flickr album contains various photos from that trip …

We spent the first couple days recovering from jet-lag in Interlaken, Switzerland. This is the site of the Jungfrau and various other spectacular peaks in the Alps range — but it was so foggy that we could hardly see anything. I’ve included a couple of videos of a tram ride down the mountain, as well as some paraglider who floated down into the town park.

We then traveled to Bern, where we got on-board a Viking Cruise ship that headed north for the next several days — eventually arriving in Amsterdam, after making stops nearly every day to see ancient castles and fortresses, as well as various villages and small towns that have survived various wars, tyrants, and regimes for well over a thousand years.

From our final cruise destination in Amsterdam, we flew to Berlin — where we spent a few days at a very nice hotel that turned out to be in what was once East Berlin. Indeed, the separation between East and West Berlin, once so obvious and important, is now almost impossible for a visitor to spot. Except for some rubble, and a few small mementoes (like Checkpoint Charlie, a few blocks from our hotel), there is no obvious difference between East and West from pre-1989 days.

Nice Checkpoint Charlie Hotel Berlin Mitte photos

Check out these checkpoint charlie hotel berlin mitte images:

Holocaust exhibit #3
checkpoint charlie hotel berlin mitte
Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day" for Oct 18,2015.

The Holocaust exhibit, officially known as the “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe” (”Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas” in German), is a memorial in the center of Berlin dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. It consists of a 4.7-acre site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The slabs are 7 ft 10 in long, 3 ft 1 in wide, and they vary in height from 7.9 in to 15 ft 9.0 in. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west—at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims. Building of the exhibit began on April 1, 2003, and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate.

I had never heard of the exhibit before I arrived; and because I am neither Jewish nor German, I had no idea what to expect. But I can tell you that it is one of the most somber, powerful, and moving exhibits I have ever seen. It was difficult for me to photograph — not because of any technical complexities, but because I had a difficult time keeping my hands from shaking as I took the photos.

**********************************
For the final few days of our vacation, we traveled by air from Amsterdam to Berlin — and spent about four days in the “Mitte” section of the city, quite close to what was once the dividing line between East and West Berlin; indeed, our hotel was technically in East Berlin.

We spent the first afternoon wandering around the local area, partly to see the infamous “Checkpoint Charlie” (just a few blocks from our hotel), and partly to get a sense of the buildings, the people, and the overall “look and feel” of the city. Since I spend much of my time focusing on “street photography” in New York, I did the same thing here … and aside from the German language that you’ll see on a few of the signposts, the people look much the same as they do in any other big city.

I did get a few photos of the Brandenburg Gate and the Holocaust Exhibition, and some video clips from inside the TierGarten (which I’ll upload in the next few days). I also took quite a few photos of some “street art” that was created on one of the few remaining sections of the old Berlin Wall; these two will be uploaded in the next few days.

We took a driving tour around the city one morning, including a quick circle around the old 1936 Olympic Stadium; we also had lunch in a fancy restaurant atop the old Reichstag Building, which is now (as I understand it) the home of the German legislature. But I certainly don’t feel that I saw very much of the entire city; it would be like making a whirlwind tour around a few parts of Manhattan, and then trying to claim that you’ve seen all of New York City.

As a child of the Cold War (and having been born exactly one year befor the day that Hitler committed suicide), I have always been intrigued by Berlin — and would love to go back several more times to see more of the neighborhoods, the culture, and the people. I don’t think I would ever claim to “know” Berlin in any complete sense; indeed, I don’t even feel that way about New York, after living here for 45+ years. But I could certainly learn a lot more, and I found it sufficiently interesting that I would like to learn more…

**********************************

During the first two weeks of September 2015, we took a river cruise down the Rhine River, and wrapped up the trip with a few days in Berlin. This Flickr album contains various photos from that trip …

We spent the first couple days recovering from jet-lag in Interlaken, Switzerland. This is the site of the Jungfrau and various other spectacular peaks in the Alps range — but it was so foggy that we could hardly see anything. I’ve included a couple of videos of a tram ride down the mountain, as well as some paraglider who floated down into the town park.

We then traveled to Basel, where we got on-board a Viking Cruise ship that headed north for the next several days — eventually arriving in Amsterdam, after making stops nearly every day to see ancient castles and fortresses, as well as various villages and small towns that have survived various wars, tyrants, and regimes for well over a thousand years.

From our final cruise destination in Amsterdam, we flew to Berlin — where we spent a few days at a very nice hotel that turned out to be in what was once East Berlin. Indeed, the separation between East and West Berlin, once so obvious and important, is now almost impossible for a visitor to spot. Except for some rubble, and a few small mementoes (like Checkpoint Charlie, a few blocks from our hotel), there is no obvious difference between East and West from pre-1989 days.

Nice Restaurants Mitte Berlin photos

A few nice restaurants mitte berlin images I found:

Berlin, Mitte, Kaffe – restaurant “ Altes Europa „, Gipsstraße 11.
restaurants mitte berlin
Image by (vincent desjardins)
www.europastrand.de/
Gipsstraße 11, 10119 Berlin

café Sympa.
pour revenir

спутник
restaurants mitte berlin
Image by glasseyes view
Restaurant Москва, Karl-Marx-Allee

restaurant
restaurants mitte berlin
Image by stijn
… in the Gipsstrasse (forgot the name of it)