Schlagwort-Archive: COOL

Cool Zehlendorf Steglitz images

A few nice zehlendorf steglitz images I found:

Bikeway
zehlendorf steglitz
Image by Hans-Jörg Aleff
Berlin 2014

Glienicker Brücke Berlin-Potsdam Februar 2011_024
zehlendorf steglitz
Image by marlon_75
Die von 1904 bis 1907 errichtete Glienicker Brücke wurde im Zweiten Weltkrieg zerstört und 1949 als ,Brücke der Einheit wieder eröffnet. Die Machthaber der DDR, die ihr diesen Namen gaben, verhinderten jahrzehntelang die Einheit Deutschlands. Nach dem Mauerbau 1961 durfte die Brücke nur noch von alliierten Militärs und Diplomaten passiert werden. Durch die friedliche Revolution in der DDR ist die ,Glienicker Brücke seit dem 10. November 1989 wieder für jedermann offen.

Cool Berlin Berolina images

Some cool berlin berolina images:

Hard to Leave
berlin berolina
Image by Pensiero
Berlin

www.stefanocorso.com

De Beeren-Lina. Pardon, die Berolina.
berlin berolina
Image by ЯAFIK ♋ BERLIN
Dett Klo hatte über eine Million Besucher, klaro! Gibt’s dort seit Kaisers Zeiten! Na, wohin guckt sie denn, und das mit gerümpfter Nase? ….auf die Bedürfnisanstalt, das zum Himmel stinkende Pissoir! (….unten rechts im Bild).

Die Berolina Alexanderplatz
berlin berolina
Image by janwillemsen
de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berolina

Cool Hotels Berlin Mitte Friedrichstraße images

Some cool hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße images:

Friedrichstraße 019
hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße
Image by lilli2de
Hotels, Ärztehaus, Shoppingmile

Rio Spree / Spree River
hotels berlin mitte friedrichstraße
Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura
Estação de trem urbano (S-Bahn) Friederichstrasse.

The Friedrichstraße (lit. Frederick Street) is a major culture and shopping street in central Berlin, forming the core of the Friedrichstadt neighborhood. It runs from the northern part of the old Mitte district (north of which it is called Chausseestraße) to the Hallesches Tor in the district of Kreuzberg. Due to its north-southerly direction, it forms important junctions with the east-western axes, most notably with Leipziger Straße and Unter den Linden. The U6 U-Bahn line runs underneath. During the Cold War it was bisected by the Berlin Wall and was the location of Checkpoint Charlie.

As central Berlin’s traditional shopping street, Friedrichstraße is three blocks east of the parallel Wilhelmstraße, the historic heart of the old government quarter (Regierungsviertel) until 1945.

The Friedrichstraße was badly damaged during World War II and only partly rebuilt during the division of Berlin. The section in West Berlin was partly rebuilt as a residential street; in the late 1960s, the remains of the former Belle-Alliance-Platz at the end of the Friedrichstraße, renamed Mehringplatz, were completely demolished and replaced with a concrete housing and office development designed by Hans Scharoun. Despite its central location, this area remains relatively poor.

In the East Berlin section, plans were put into place to widen the street to four lanes as was done to the Leipziger Straße; the Hotel Unter den Linden (demolished 2006) and the original Lindencorso (demolished 1991) were the only structures built during this time with the wider profile of the street in mind. The Grand Hotel Berlin, East Germany’s top 5-star hotel, was built across from the Hotel Unter den Linden in 1987. Further plans were drawn up for a rebuilding of the street, and construction was well underway at the time of German reunification in 1990, when the East German Plattenbau-based construction was stopped and subsequently demolished; only a few buildings that were already complete and occupied were spared. The completed Berlin Casino building located at the corner of Leipziger Straße was torn down in 1994.

Friedrichstraße was rebuilt in the 1990s, and at the time it was the city’s largest construction project; work continues north of Friedrichstraße station. A number of well-known architects contributed to the plans, including Jean Nouvel, who designed the Galeries Lafayette department store and Philip Johnson, who created the American Business Center at Checkpoint Charlie. The redevelopment received mixed reviews, but the street once again became a popular shopping destination.

During the Cold War and division of Berlin, the Friedrichstraße underground station, despite being located in East Berlin, was utilized by two intersecting West Berlin S-Bahn lines and the West Berlin subway line U6. The station served as a transfer point for these lines, and trains stopped there, although all other stations on these lines in East Berlin were sealed-off ghost stations (Geisterbahnhof), where trains passed through under guard without stopping. At Friedrichstraße station, West Berlin passengers could transfer from one platform to another but could not leave the station without the appropriate papers. The section of the station open to West Berlin lines was heavily guarded and was sealed off from the smaller part of it serving as a terminus of the East Berlin S-Bahn and as a station for long-distance trains.
Wikipedia

Die Friedrichstraße liegt in den Berliner Ortsteilen Mitte und Kreuzberg. Sie ist eine der bekanntesten Straßen im östlichen Zentrum Berlins und wurde nach dem Kurfürsten Friedrich III. von Brandenburg benannt. Dieser regierte von 1688 bis 1713 und war ab 1701 als Friedrich I. König in Preußen.
Wikipedia

Cool Berlin Piercing Shop images

Check out these berlin piercing shop images:

Phil Collins @ Tanya Bonakdar
berlin piercing shop
Image by Medieval Karl
"my heart’s in my hand, and my hand is pierced, and my hand’s in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught"

"Since the late 1990s, Collins’ diverse practice has addressed the act of image-making itself, reflecting on the status of the individual and the collective in today’s media-dominated society. Characteristic of the artist’s approach is a close engagement with place and communities, which over the years have included disco-dancing Palestinians, fans of The Smiths across three continents, the youth of Baghdad, and teachers of Marxism-Leninism in the former German Democratic Republic. The projects are often initiated through public announcements and structured as situations

predicated on high emotional stakes. Rather than static portraits, the works resulting from these encounters articulate the nuances of relations embedded in the aesthetic regimes and economies that define our everyday existence, from news and politics to entertainment and shopping. Throughout, Collins’ work upholds his commitment to myriad forms of experience across the social spectrum, and furthers his interest in the contradictory impulses of intimacy and desire within the public sphere.

In the installation This Unfortunate Thing Between Us, Collins probes the overlap and disconnection between reality and representation. Based on his 2011 project TUTBU.TV, an alternative shopping channel which was performed in a Berlin theatre and broadcast live on German national television over two nights, This Unfortunate Thing Between Us offered viewers the chance to buy an experience and enact it live on stage the following evening. Exploiting the logic and presentation of popular teleshopping programs, TUTBU.TV was hosted by a cast of actors, porn workers and musicians, with pitches and live phone-ins, telephone operators managing calls from the public, and a soundtrack by the in-house band featuring Welsh musician Gruff Rhys and North Wales surf band Y Niwl. Two complete subtitled episodes of the original event are now presented in second-hand British caravans, which for Collins epitomize both the optimism and melancholy of the consumer age, their promise of mobility and freedom forestalled by the tedium and misery of a typical family holiday. Weaving together exhibitionism and voyeurism, authenticity and fiction, This Unfortunate Thing Between Us reassembles the language of reality television in a new bastardized grammar in order to describe the complex love affair between the camera and its subjects, with all its anxieties and expectations.

Like TUTBU.TV, the artist’s installations sometimes recall film or stage sets – frames that allow for affective encounters between viewer and subject, as well as amongst visitors themselves. Within the upstairs main gallery, six specially designed listening booths house Collins’ most recent work, my heart’s in my hand, and my hand is pierced, and my hand’s in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught, a project conceived in collaboration with guests of a survival station for the homeless in Cologne. There, Collins installed a phone booth with a free line that anyone could use for unlimited local and international calls on the agreement that the conversations would be recorded and then anonymized. The selected material was posted to a group of musicians, including David Sylvian, Scritti Politti, Lætitia Sadier, Maria Minerva and Damon & Naomi, among others, who used these recordings as source material to produce original songs presented here inside the booths as 7” vinyl records. The installation evokes the transformative potential of pop music, its ability to create and counter distance and speak to the contemporary moment. Having worked for a homeless magazine in the 1990s, Collins has a long-standing interest in issues relating to these communities. Bringing to the fore the lyrical and narrative potential of the human voice when it stands in for subjects of city life who are purposely ignored and routinely overlooked, he dramatizes the moment of communication as an intimate and ambivalent exchange.

Installed in the side gallery upstairs, Collins’s short film the meaning of style offers a poetic look at constructions of identity through the examination of a specific subculture. Filmed with a group of young anti-fascist skinheads the artist encountered in Malaysia, this work takes its title from British theorist Dick Hebdige’s study Subculture: The Meaning of Style (1979), an influential interpretation of the cultural styles shaped by Britain’s post-war youth. Here, Collins looks at the local adoption of skinhead subculture, originally a black and white working class movement, in the form of a cinematic reverie set to an original soundtrack. Incorporating a rich collage of cultural symbols and architecture from both East and West, the film provides a delicate frame for reflection on the relationship between British colonial history and contemporary subcultures in this region of the world. "

Phil Collins @ Tanya Bonakdar
berlin piercing shop
Image by Medieval Karl
"This Unfortunate Things Between Us"
"Since the late 1990s, Collins’ diverse practice has addressed the act of image-making itself, reflecting on the status of the individual and the collective in today’s media-dominated society. Characteristic of the artist’s approach is a close engagement with place and communities, which over the years have included disco-dancing Palestinians, fans of The Smiths across three continents, the youth of Baghdad, and teachers of Marxism-Leninism in the former German Democratic Republic. The projects are often initiated through public announcements and structured as situations

predicated on high emotional stakes. Rather than static portraits, the works resulting from these encounters articulate the nuances of relations embedded in the aesthetic regimes and economies that define our everyday existence, from news and politics to entertainment and shopping. Throughout, Collins’ work upholds his commitment to myriad forms of experience across the social spectrum, and furthers his interest in the contradictory impulses of intimacy and desire within the public sphere.

In the installation This Unfortunate Thing Between Us, Collins probes the overlap and disconnection between reality and representation. Based on his 2011 project TUTBU.TV, an alternative shopping channel which was performed in a Berlin theatre and broadcast live on German national television over two nights, This Unfortunate Thing Between Us offered viewers the chance to buy an experience and enact it live on stage the following evening. Exploiting the logic and presentation of popular teleshopping programs, TUTBU.TV was hosted by a cast of actors, porn workers and musicians, with pitches and live phone-ins, telephone operators managing calls from the public, and a soundtrack by the in-house band featuring Welsh musician Gruff Rhys and North Wales surf band Y Niwl. Two complete subtitled episodes of the original event are now presented in second-hand British caravans, which for Collins epitomize both the optimism and melancholy of the consumer age, their promise of mobility and freedom forestalled by the tedium and misery of a typical family holiday. Weaving together exhibitionism and voyeurism, authenticity and fiction, This Unfortunate Thing Between Us reassembles the language of reality television in a new bastardized grammar in order to describe the complex love affair between the camera and its subjects, with all its anxieties and expectations.

Like TUTBU.TV, the artist’s installations sometimes recall film or stage sets – frames that allow for affective encounters between viewer and subject, as well as amongst visitors themselves. Within the upstairs main gallery, six specially designed listening booths house Collins’ most recent work, my heart’s in my hand, and my hand is pierced, and my hand’s in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught, a project conceived in collaboration with guests of a survival station for the homeless in Cologne. There, Collins installed a phone booth with a free line that anyone could use for unlimited local and international calls on the agreement that the conversations would be recorded and then anonymized. The selected material was posted to a group of musicians, including David Sylvian, Scritti Politti, Lætitia Sadier, Maria Minerva and Damon & Naomi, among others, who used these recordings as source material to produce original songs presented here inside the booths as 7” vinyl records. The installation evokes the transformative potential of pop music, its ability to create and counter distance and speak to the contemporary moment. Having worked for a homeless magazine in the 1990s, Collins has a long-standing interest in issues relating to these communities. Bringing to the fore the lyrical and narrative potential of the human voice when it stands in for subjects of city life who are purposely ignored and routinely overlooked, he dramatizes the moment of communication as an intimate and ambivalent exchange.

Installed in the side gallery upstairs, Collins’s short film the meaning of style offers a poetic look at constructions of identity through the examination of a specific subculture. Filmed with a group of young anti-fascist skinheads the artist encountered in Malaysia, this work takes its title from British theorist Dick Hebdige’s study Subculture: The Meaning of Style (1979), an influential interpretation of the cultural styles shaped by Britain’s post-war youth. Here, Collins looks at the local adoption of skinhead subculture, originally a black and white working class movement, in the form of a cinematic reverie set to an original soundtrack. Incorporating a rich collage of cultural symbols and architecture from both East and West, the film provides a delicate frame for reflection on the relationship between British colonial history and contemporary subcultures in this region of the world. "