Schlagwort-Archive: Berlin

Nice Heimathafen Berlin Neukölln photos

Check out these heimathafen berlin neukölln images:

Little dragon at heimathafen
heimathafen berlin neukölln
Image by izillR
Little dragon at 24.02.2014, heimathafen, neukölln, berlin.

Howling @ Heimathafen Neukölln #berlin #concert
heimathafen berlin neukölln
Image by jack-opo

/home-port#─────██████████════█
heimathafen berlin neukölln
Image by ! /streetart#__+__www.♥.tk ﴾͡๏̯͡๏﴿
©██████████████████████profile □ note███████████████████████>↑

perma url
6de.de/home-port#─────██████████════█

values from the ☺
•easy typable character + url ☺.tk -_- typed [ALT] + [1]
• you can access shortinfos ,files, folders, favorites/bookimarks by typing this character -_- Animation 1mm.de/-_-.gif

Nice Bb Hotel Berlin photos

A few nice bb hotel berlin images I found:

Image taken from page 602 of ‚[Appleton’s European Guide Book illustrated. Including England, Scotland, and Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Northern and Southern Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Portugal, Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Cont
bb hotel berlin
Image by The British Library
View this map on the BL Georeferencer service.

Image taken from:

Title: "[Appleton’s European Guide Book illustrated. Including England, Scotland, and Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Northern and Southern Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Portugal, Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Containing … maps, etc.]"
Author: APPLETON, Daniel – AND CO
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10107.bb.1."
Page: 602
Place of Publishing: New York
Date of Publishing: 1877
Publisher: D. Appleton & Co.
Edition: Tenth edition … revised and corrected.
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000100294

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‚Explore‘.
Open the page in the British Library’s itemViewer (page image 602)
Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 602 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

Image taken from page 490 of ‚[Appleton’s European Guide Book illustrated. Including England, Scotland, and Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Northern and Southern Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Portugal, Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Cont
bb hotel berlin
Image by The British Library
View this map on the BL Georeferencer service.

Image taken from:

Title: "[Appleton’s European Guide Book illustrated. Including England, Scotland, and Ireland, France, Belgium, Holland, Northern and Southern Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Spain and Portugal, Russia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Containing … maps, etc.]"
Author: APPLETON, Daniel – AND CO
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10107.bb.20."
Page: 490
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1872
Publisher: Longmans & Co.
Edition: Fifth edition, corrected to June 1, 1872.
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000100289

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‚Explore‘.
Download the PDF for this book (volume: 0) Image found on book scan 490 (NB not necessarily a page number)
Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

Nice Berlin Hotel Berlin photos

A few nice berlin hotel berlin images I found:

20071018 Berlin EOS1362
berlin hotel berlin
Image by Mr Ulster
Luise Berlin Hotel. Berlin, Germany.

[Berlin] Hotel Adlon
berlin hotel berlin
Image by filmfrenzy
Site of Michael Jackson’s infamous "baby dangling out the window" scene

Adina Berlin
berlin hotel berlin
Image by Traveloscopy
These images have been supplied to www.traveloscopy.com on the understanding they are copyright released and/or royalty free.

Nice Alt Tempelhof Berlin photos

Some cool alt tempelhof berlin images:

Berlin – Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin – Alte Koffer 50er Jahre 01
alt tempelhof berlin
Image by Daniel Mennerich
Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin ("German Museum of Technology") was founded in 1982 in Berlin, Germany, and exhibits a large collection of historical technical artifacts. The museum’s main emphasis is on rail transport, but it also features exhibits of various sorts of industrial technology. Recently, it has opened both maritime and aviation exhibition halls. The museum also contains a science center called Spectrum.

On May 15, 2002, a special exhibition opened which featured the inventions of computer pioneer Konrad Zuse, including a reproduction of the Z1.

It is located in the Kreuzberg district of Berlin, in buildings formerly part of the freight depot attached to the Anhalter Bahnhof. The building’s famous C-47 ‚Raisinbomber‘ Skytrain can be seen with ease from the top of the Fernsehturm and in the past from a descending aircraft landing at Tempelhof Airport.

The museum contains many relics throughout, including an enormous railway collection, a large aircraft section which houses a Messerschmitt Bf 110, Flak cannon, the last Focke-Wulf Fw 200 and a V-1 flying bomb. The Cessna that Mathias Rust flew to Moscow during the cold war has also been added to the exhibition.

Berlin – Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin – Alte Koffer 50er Jahre 02
alt tempelhof berlin
Image by Daniel Mennerich
Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin ("German Museum of Technology") was founded in 1982 in Berlin, Germany, and exhibits a large collection of historical technical artifacts. The museum’s main emphasis is on rail transport, but it also features exhibits of various sorts of industrial technology. Recently, it has opened both maritime and aviation exhibition halls. The museum also contains a science center called Spectrum.

On May 15, 2002, a special exhibition opened which featured the inventions of computer pioneer Konrad Zuse, including a reproduction of the Z1.

It is located in the Kreuzberg district of Berlin, in buildings formerly part of the freight depot attached to the Anhalter Bahnhof. The building’s famous C-47 ‚Raisinbomber‘ Skytrain can be seen with ease from the top of the Fernsehturm and in the past from a descending aircraft landing at Tempelhof Airport.

The museum contains many relics throughout, including an enormous railway collection, a large aircraft section which houses a Messerschmitt Bf 110, Flak cannon, the last Focke-Wulf Fw 200 and a V-1 flying bomb. The Cessna that Mathias Rust flew to Moscow during the cold war has also been added to the exhibition.

Alt Tempelhof
alt tempelhof berlin
Image by bloqseven

Cool Hotel Berlin Apartment images

A few nice hotel berlin apartment images I found:

Karl-Marx-Allee Berlin
hotel berlin apartment
Image by Roberto Maldeno

The Karl-Marx-Allee is a monumental socialist boulevard built by the GDR between 1952 and 1960 in Berlin Friedrichshain and Mitte. Today the boulevard is named after Karl Marx.

The boulevard was named Stalinallee between 1949 and 1961 (previously Große Frankfurter Straße), and was a flagship building project of East Germany’s reconstruction programme after World War II. It was designed by the architects Hermann Henselmann, Hartmann, Hopp, Leucht, Paulick and Souradny to contain spacious and luxurious apartments for plain workers, as well as shops, restaurants, cafés, a tourist hotel and an enormous cinema (the International).

The avenue, which is 89 m wide and nearly 2 km long, is lined with monumental eight-storey buildings designed in the wedding-cake style, the socialist classicism of the Soviet Union. At each end are dual towers at Frankfurter Tor and Strausberger Platz designed by Hermann Henselmann. The buildings differ in the revetments of the facades which contain often equally, traditional Berlin motifs by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Most of the buildings are covered by architectural ceramics.

On June 17, 1953 the Stalinallee became the focus of a worker uprising which endangered the young state’s existence. Builders and construction workers demonstrated against the communist government, leading to a national uprising. The rebellion was quashed with Soviet tanks and troops, resulting in the loss of at least 125 lives.

Later the street was used for East Germany’s annual May Day parade, featuring thousands of soldiers along with tanks and other military vehicles to showcase the power and the glory of the communist government.

De-Stalinization led to the renaming of the street, after the founder of Marxism, in late 1961. Since the collapse of Eastern European communism in 1989/1990, renaming the street back to its prewar name Große Frankfurter Straße has periodically been discussed, so far without conclusive results.

The boulevard later found favour with postmodernists, with Philip Johnson describing it as ‚true city planning on the grand scale‘, while Aldo Rossi called it ‚Europe’s last great street.'[1] Since German reunification most of the buildings, including the two towers, have been restored.

column Spectrum
Ik flaneer door Friedrichshain, Oost-Berlijn, mijn tijdelijke woonplaats. Samen met correspondent Wierd Duk mag ik een paar weken lezers van deze krant gidsen. Ze zijn hier gekomen voor de herdenking van de val van de Muur. Verderop, op de Karl-Marx-Allee, vertelde ik over de voormalige paradeweg die – dat weet een gids – 89 meter breed is en bijna 2 kilometer lang. Hier, temidden van stalinistische pronkarchitectuur, werd in 1953 een arbeidersopstand neergeslagen (er zouden meer opstanden komen in het geknevelde Oost-Europa). En hier, aan het einde van die 2 kilometer asfalt, daar waar de Alexanderplatz gloort, werd 25 jaar geleden een nieuw bloedbad voorkomen. Het wonder van een geweldloze revolutie die van twee Duitslanden er weer eentje zoumaken.Graag bewandel ik deze laan van baardige Karel, die daarvoor naar Jozef (Stalin) was vernoemd en daarvoor gewoon Grosse Frankfurter Strasse heette. Modelflats staan er. Monumentale blokken met Griekse zuilen voor de hoofdingang. Soms zelfs marmer in de hal en surrogaatkroonluchters. Arbeiderspaleizen, sociale woningbouw voor de werkman. Ruime flats, hoge plafonds. En dat voor een huur van 50 Mark per maand. Zo willen we allemaal welwonen, toch?Ik check het bij een oudere man die net uit zo’n flat stapt. Dat van die lage huur klopt, antwoordt hij. De socialistische heilsstaat was de huurbaas. Tot aan het einde van de DDR. Na 1989 werd zijn apparte- ment verkocht aan een Duitse belegger. Die trok de huur op naar inmiddels 700 euro. Ja, best een ver- schil, vindt deze meneer, die oogt als een ambte- naar. Wat hij deed, durf ik niet goed te vragen. Het is bekend dat veel van de voor arbeiders bestemde modelflats uiteindelijk zo gewild bleken, dat ze wer- den ingepikt door mensen met relaties. Jongens van het regime, vriendjes. Tja, zo gaat dat. En niet alleen in socialistische republieken die van en voor het volk zeggen te zijn.Wat gebeurt er nu met de Karl-Marx-Allee, vraag ik hem. De straat gaat dood, concludeer ik uit zijn ant- woord. Voor oudjes als hij – pas als ze doodgaan mogen de onroerendgoedjongens de huurprijzen echt door het plafond jagen, voor de volgende bewoners – zijn er nauwelijks nog winkels waar je wat aan hebt. Geen groenteboer meer, geen bakker, geen kruidenier. Ja, een paar straten verderop, eentje. Een vriendelijke nachtturk die tot in de kleine uur- tjes bier, brood, beleg en lottoformulieren verkoopt. Dit soort winkels komen en gaan, weet de man, ter- wijl hij wijst naar een protserig restaurant waarin drie mensen zitten te eten. Een vol ambitie ingericht eethuis dat het ook niet gaat redden, dat voel je al. Want de Karl-Marx-Allee is een schaduw, een halteplaats voor Berlijngidsen. Eentje waar je lezers vertelt over 50 Mark huur.Ik hoor in gedachten de melodie van Over de muur van Klein Orkest en neurie mijn eigen tekstje: ‘Oost-Berlijn, Karl Marx Allee:Er wandelden mensen langs vlaggen en vaandels. Waar Stalin ooit op een voetstuk stond.’

Karl-Marx-Allee
hotel berlin apartment
Image by Roberto Maldeno

The Karl-Marx-Allee is a monumental socialist boulevard built by the GDR between 1952 and 1960 in Berlin Friedrichshain and Mitte. Today the boulevard is named after Karl Marx.

The boulevard was named Stalinallee between 1949 and 1961 (previously Große Frankfurter Straße), and was a flagship building project of East Germany’s reconstruction programme after World War II. It was designed by the architects Hermann Henselmann, Hartmann, Hopp, Leucht, Paulick and Souradny to contain spacious and luxurious apartments for plain workers, as well as shops, restaurants, cafés, a tourist hotel and an enormous cinema (the International).

The avenue, which is 89 m wide and nearly 2 km long, is lined with monumental eight-storey buildings designed in the wedding-cake style, the socialist classicism of the Soviet Union. At each end are dual towers at Frankfurter Tor and Strausberger Platz designed by Hermann Henselmann. The buildings differ in the revetments of the facades which contain often equally, traditional Berlin motifs by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Most of the buildings are covered by architectural ceramics.

On June 17, 1953 the Stalinallee became the focus of a worker uprising which endangered the young state’s existence. Builders and construction workers demonstrated against the communist government, leading to a national uprising. The rebellion was quashed with Soviet tanks and troops, resulting in the loss of at least 125 lives.

Later the street was used for East Germany’s annual May Day parade, featuring thousands of soldiers along with tanks and other military vehicles to showcase the power and the glory of the communist government.

De-Stalinization led to the renaming of the street, after the founder of Marxism, in late 1961. Since the collapse of Eastern European communism in 1989/1990, renaming the street back to its prewar name Große Frankfurter Straße has periodically been discussed, so far without conclusive results.

The boulevard later found favour with postmodernists, with Philip Johnson describing it as ‚true city planning on the grand scale‘, while Aldo Rossi called it ‚Europe’s last great street.'[1] Since German reunification most of the buildings, including the two towers, have been restored.

column Spectrum
Ik flaneer door Friedrichshain, Oost-Berlijn, mijn tijdelijke woonplaats. Samen met correspondent Wierd Duk mag ik een paar weken lezers van deze krant gidsen. Ze zijn hier gekomen voor de herdenking van de val van de Muur. Verderop, op de Karl-Marx-Allee, vertelde ik over de voormalige paradeweg die – dat weet een gids – 89 meter breed is en bijna 2 kilometer lang. Hier, temidden van stalinistische pronkarchitectuur, werd in 1953 een arbeidersopstand neergeslagen (er zouden meer opstanden komen in het geknevelde Oost-Europa). En hier, aan het einde van die 2 kilometer asfalt, daar waar de Alexanderplatz gloort, werd 25 jaar geleden een nieuw bloedbad voorkomen. Het wonder van een geweldloze revolutie die van twee Duitslanden er weer eentje zoumaken.Graag bewandel ik deze laan van baardige Karel, die daarvoor naar Jozef (Stalin) was vernoemd en daarvoor gewoon Grosse Frankfurter Strasse heette. Modelflats staan er. Monumentale blokken met Griekse zuilen voor de hoofdingang. Soms zelfs marmer in de hal en surrogaatkroonluchters. Arbeiderspaleizen, sociale woningbouw voor de werkman. Ruime flats, hoge plafonds. En dat voor een huur van 50 Mark per maand. Zo willen we allemaal welwonen, toch?Ik check het bij een oudere man die net uit zo’n flat stapt. Dat van die lage huur klopt, antwoordt hij. De socialistische heilsstaat was de huurbaas. Tot aan het einde van de DDR. Na 1989 werd zijn apparte- ment verkocht aan een Duitse belegger. Die trok de huur op naar inmiddels 700 euro. Ja, best een ver- schil, vindt deze meneer, die oogt als een ambte- naar. Wat hij deed, durf ik niet goed te vragen. Het is bekend dat veel van de voor arbeiders bestemde modelflats uiteindelijk zo gewild bleken, dat ze wer- den ingepikt door mensen met relaties. Jongens van het regime, vriendjes. Tja, zo gaat dat. En niet alleen in socialistische republieken die van en voor het volk zeggen te zijn.Wat gebeurt er nu met de Karl-Marx-Allee, vraag ik hem. De straat gaat dood, concludeer ik uit zijn ant- woord. Voor oudjes als hij – pas als ze doodgaan mogen de onroerendgoedjongens de huurprijzen echt door het plafond jagen, voor de volgende bewoners – zijn er nauwelijks nog winkels waar je wat aan hebt. Geen groenteboer meer, geen bakker, geen kruidenier. Ja, een paar straten verderop, eentje. Een vriendelijke nachtturk die tot in de kleine uur- tjes bier, brood, beleg en lottoformulieren verkoopt. Dit soort winkels komen en gaan, weet de man, ter- wijl hij wijst naar een protserig restaurant waarin drie mensen zitten te eten. Een vol ambitie ingericht eethuis dat het ook niet gaat redden, dat voel je al. Want de Karl-Marx-Allee is een schaduw, een halteplaats voor Berlijngidsen. Eentje waar je lezers vertelt over 50 Mark huur.Ik hoor in gedachten de melodie van Over de muur van Klein Orkest en neurie mijn eigen tekstje: ‘Oost-Berlijn, Karl Marx Allee:Er wandelden mensen langs vlaggen en vaandels. Waar Stalin ooit op een voetstuk stond.’