CL – Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871

A few nice gay hotel berlin images I found:

CL – Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
gay hotel berlin
Image by brizzle born and bred
Mathews‘ Bristol Street Directory 1871

Clare Road, Victoria Road, Cotham

George James Smith, Lindsay villa
Charles Anthony Hensler, Black Forest villa
Sebastian Smith
John Looker
George Acutt
Charles Eustance
Mrs Stone
William Griffin, Charlton villa
Frederick Smith, Kerry villa
Mrs Mary Weston
Mrs Hannah Shipley
Henry Mawbey
Thomas Woodhouse, Glenusk

Clare Street, Corn Street to Drawbridge

William and Freerick Morgan, stationers
David Glass & Co. tobacconists
Mary Ann Wetherman, Berlin warehouse
Charles William Bragge, public-accountant
Evans & Hancock, marine assurance agents
Sam. J. Kepple, china & glass warehouse

S J Kepple & Son, 3 Clare Street (China and Glass)

In October Samuel James Kepple was injured, during building repairs at his premises, by a large beam that fell through the skylight inflicting a scalp wound. He was taken to the Infirmary where his wound was dressed by Mr Haarant and then went back to his home, Etruria Villa, Southfield Road, Cotham.

William Henry Atchley, solicitor
John Bussell, house decorator
H. R. Fargus & Co. auctioneers
Richard William Morris, marine surveyor and broker
Phillips and Miles, photographers
Walter and Co. grocers
Essex La Trobe, stationery and fancy-goods warehouse
Portishead Railway Co. – J. F. R. Daniel, secretary
J. Wintle & Son, silk mercers and drapers
James Smith, boot maker
Phillips and Miles. photographers
Joseph Thomas Harris, engineer and metal manufacturer
William Theodore Watkins, solicitor
James A. Biggs, ironmonger & cutler
Henry Jacob Sturge, ironmongery & stove grate warehouse
John Frost, artists’ repository
Sargent and Yeoman, hat manufacturer
Henry H. Eve, working jeweller
William Brown, boot maker
Nathaniel Strickland, solicitor
Herr Zachari, photographer
William Palmer, boot maker
Benjamin Bedell, solicitor
Charles John White, photographer
Penny & Co. booksellers
Edward Thornley, hat maker and general out-fitter
Henry C. Walters, hosier & out-fitter
Henry Smith, boot maker
James Gent Wood, attorney
Daniel Parsley, hat maker
Samuel Jones, whip and fishing rod manufacturer
Edwin J. Manning, provision factor
James Crouch & Co. auctioneers
William Matthew Killby, solicitor
Henry T. Chamberlain, West India produce broker
George B. May, bookseller
George William Lucas, stock & share broker
John Gunning, solicitor
Charles Wintle, attorney
Edward Stock, stock broker, etc.
William Tucker, silversmith
St. Stephens Church – Rector, Rev F. Wayett. The Sextoness resides, at 47 Queen Square
Isaac E. Chillcott, bookseller, printer
W. Beloe & Co. produce brokers
Thomas Gay, hosier and out-fitter
William Coates, wholesale importer of fancy goods
Reynold John Hall, stock and share broker
J. Hunter & Co. nurseryman and seed merchant
W. R. Richardson, solicitor
Henry Lloyd, architect, auctioneer, accountant, etc.
Sherwood Smith & Co. house agents
Edward J. Pike, public accountant
Sayce, Jones & Co. stock brokers
Richard Waites, tea dealer and grocer
A John Bennett, stock & share broker
Bristol & South Wales Railway Office
New Passage Hotel Co.
Bristol Chambers of Commerce – L. Bruton, secretary

Claremont Buildings, Twinnell Street to Easton Parade

Union Tavern Claremont Buildings, Easton Road

1848 – 53. John Passmore / 1871. Henry Amos Patten Hall / 1878 – 83. Walter William Patten Hall / 1885 – 86. Mary James 1887. George Broad / 1889 – 91. William Jones / 1892 – 1906. George Mills / 1909 – 37. Ernest Thomas 1944 – 47. William James Gough / 1950. Robert Philips / 1953. Arthur Tuckner.

Claremont Crescent, Elton Terrace, Horfield

Claremont Crescent, top of Stokes Croft

Claremont Place, Stapleton Road Road to Claremont Street

Joseph Richards, brass moulder
John Dean
Alfred Exell, professor of music
Mrs Clifford
William J. Finch
Alfred G. Williams
John Price
Robert Handley, com-trav
Mary Silcox
Sophia Herapath
Daniel Charles Curnick, accountant
Rev. Thomas Maynard
Thomas Nelmes
George Beake, custom house officer
Edwin Jones, printer, etc

Claremont Place, Whiteladies, to Victoria Place, Victoria Park

Frederick Paul
George A. Miller
John Perry

Claremont Street, Stapleton Road to Baptist Mills

William Hill
Henry Harris

Joseph High, vict, Claremont Tavern (pub) On the corner of Russell Street, the Claremont Tavern was lost during the clearances to make way for the building of Easton Way in the 1960’s. The tenancy of Jesse Dickes commenced on the 5th October 1938, the rent was £65 per annum and the landlords were The Bristol Brewery Georges & Co. Limited. bristolslostpubs.eu/page235.html

Hugh Kennedy, oil merchant
Rev. Samuel Jory
Henry Wigley
Josiah Bayley
Leonard Jarvis
Charles Higgs
John Pyle
Ann Couch
?. Smith
Ann Verry
William Rayne
William Maynard, beer retailer
George Warlow
George White
George Hutchinson
Henry Clark
Silas Jaynes, grocer
Frederick Parry, grocer
William Pascoe
John D. Powell, Prospect house
Frank Pullin, accountant
J. C. C. Hole
Joseph J. Howe
Edward Jennett
William Withers
Ebenezer Croyden, currier
Isaac Hicks
Joseph P. Distin, insurance agent
Richard Hugh Smith
Rebecca Walker
William Westcott
Charles Delicate
Richard Matthews
Elizabeth Carter
James Phelps
John J. Philpott
Samuel Barrrett
Miss Barrett
Sidney Mitchell
John Westlake
John Sparks

Clarence Buildings, Easton Road

Clarence Court, Clarence Place, Kingsdown

Clarence Place, St. Michaels Hill to Oxford Street

Thomas Brooks, greengrocer
H. Davies, builder, etc
Henry Raper Pitt
Mary A. Clift
Henry B. Sennington
Mrs Baily
Joshua Voisey
William J. Smith
William Spray
William Burgess
Henry Mountsteven
Thomas H. Fowler
Thomas Cleal
Joseph M. Thresher
John Tanner
William Mastone
Mrs Eliza Nock
J. Loosman
Robert Greenville
H. Painter
James Dyer
Samuel Richards
John Taylor
Henry Painter, smith
Thomas Payne, Clarence cottage
James Painter, carpenter
Henry C. Painter, carpenter
Richard Hamilton

John Rawlings, vict, Crown Tavern (pub) 1851 – 53 Jacob Huggins / 1857. James More / 1858 – 59 George Briggs / 1861 – 72 John Rawlings / 1874 – 77 Thomas Blackmore 1878 to 1885 George Millard / 1886 – 93 Alfred Pocock / 1897 – 99 John Chorley Harvey / 1904 C. South / 1906 Charles Howell 1909 Elizabeth Neil / 1914 – 21 Mary McClean / 1925 – 38 Albert Richards / 1944 – 53 Frank Emery Jacob Huggins was a gardener and publican, on the 1841 census he is trading as a florist, in Paul Street.

John Savidge
Edward Murphy
Joseph Parsons
F. Furlong
Mrs Elizabeth McOwan
Henry Jenkins
William Henry Bryant, grocer
Thomas Badham
Solomon Knight
?. Meredith
John Knowles
Mrs W. King, dressmaker
James Fey
Frederick Jones

Clarence Place, Coronation Road

Clarence Place, Hillgrove Street, Bedminster

Clarence Place, Whitehouse Street, Bedminster

Clarence Place, West Street

Clarence Place, Clarence Road, St. Philips

Clarence Road, Bath Bridge to Bedminster Bridge

Long & Bissicks, vict, Castle & Plough (pub) On the corner with Clarence Road. this pub was demolished in the late 1950’s for the second Bath Bridge which was opened in 1960. bristolslostpubs.eu/page151.html

William Warren, vict, Old Plough, Hillsbridge Parade, Clarence Place, (pub) 1831 – 34. Joseph Doble / 1837 – 40. John Pocock / 1842 – 57. John Howard Randall / 1858 – 63. William Pearce 1865 – 66. Thomas Gregory / 1867 – 69. William Pearce / 1871. William Warren / 1874 – 87. Alfred Butt / 1889. Douglas Brighton 1891 – 96. Harry Hawkins / 1897. William Good / 1899. Mrs Mann / 1901. Thomas Lane.

George Tucker, Cambria coffee house

(Trafalgar Place)

William Dickinson, lodging house
Henry Neal, lodging house
James Schubert
William Wheller, auctioneer, etc.

(Hillsbridge Parade)

William Sampson, temperance hotel

Philip Weeks, vict, Anchor Inn Hillsbridge Parade, Clarence Road (pub) 1863 – 74. Philip Weeks / 1876 – 88. Louisa Weeks / 1889. Hannah Downey / 1891 – 97. William Sweetland 1899 – 1901. Elizabeth Rogers / 1904 – 09. Frederick Hayes / 1914 – 21. Albert Seward / 1925. Herbert Lowe.

Thomas Whatley, lodging house
Henry Nash
Joseph Hedges
John Edwards
Mrs James
William Edwards Wintle, grocer
Edwin Lockyer
William Parfitt, lodging house
William Davis, lodging house
Thomas Webb

Charles Sealy, vict, Victoria Tavern (pub) Hillsbridge Parade, Clarence Road. 1866. Ellen Cable / 1867 – 69. William Felstead / 1871. Charles Seal / 1872 to 1875. William Jones / 1876 to 1878. Thomas Powell 1879. John Hilliery / 1881 – 1909. Robert Vicary / 1914. Henry Partridge / 1917 – 21. William Rimand / 1925 – 28. James Sanders.

Henrietta Eliza Hunter
Henry Phillips, boot maker
Frederick Herbert Burgess, lodging house

Mrs A. Bishop, lodging house

John Morse, vict, Nelson’s Arms (pub) Hillsbridge Parade, Clarence Road. 1816 – 20. James Iles / 1822 – 26. John Iles / 1830 – 31. Sarah Iles / 1832 – 34. William Jenkins / 1837 – 40. William Heath 1842 – 53. Hannah Heath / 1854 to 1857. Charles Norris / 1858 to 1862. Mary Davidge / 1863 – 79. John Morse 1881. Francis Frappell / 1882 – 83. Samuel Palmer / 1886 – 89. Alfred Lewis / 1891. Emma Sylvester / 1892 – 99. George Heath 1901. George Thorne / 1904. A. Brewer / 1906. Arthur Partt / 1909. William Rowe / 1914. Albert Light / 1917 – 28. Francis Sansom 1931. Charles Cullimore / 1935. Elizabeth Shill / 1937 – 38. Harold Callaway / 1944 – 53. Herbert Leat.

William Felstead
Capt. Thomas Sullock
John Smith
Charles E. Maughan
Jeremiah Hanes

(Union Cottages)

Henry Chaffey
John Vickery
Edward Vallance
Stephen Bush, Hillsbridge house
Martha Morrison
Ann Pavey, Hillsbridge cottages
William German, Hillsbridge cottages
Mary James

(Vincent Place)

William Stephens
John Hamilton, optician
Mrs Elizabeth Powell
George Sims
Sarah Cole
Alfred Wallington
Henry Reece, sign painter, etc
Charles Light
Thomas William Horn
John Norton
John Connelly, potato stores

(Paradise Place)

Charles Keedwell
James T. Bricknell, com-trav Devon cottage
Jesse Ewart
John Hallett, cork manufacturer
Albert Hallett, confectioner
William Mitchell, coach builder, Langton cottage

(Langton Terrace)

Miss Selina Williams, school
Mrs Badcock

(Harford Place)

John Dinham
John Sellick
John Williams
Jane Bridges
Elizabeth Phillips
William Chivers
G. C. Backes
Mrs Margaret Pike
Ann Galsworthy
Capt. Frederick Lyle
Mrs Cole, ladies’ school
Richard Webb, coal merchant
Jane Weetch
Capt. W. Atkinson
Capt. James Sampson
Edward T. Alden
Llewellin Ford
Emma Trott
William Fivash
James Donovan, sail maker
Benjamin H. Rice, customs
John J. Joyce
John Cooper
Edward T. Blackmore, rope maker
John Richards, junr. timber yard
Mayor’s paddock

(Mayor’s Terrace)

Patrick O’Brien vict, Mayor’s Arms (pub) On the corner with Mayor Street, the Mayor’s Arms first became a pub around 1866 and was demolished in April 1963 to make way for high rise flats. bristolslostpubs.eu/page173.html

John Hyde
William Blinkhorn, railway contractor
James Morse

Grosvenor Place)

Edward Brice
Anthony Brown, painter & decorator
Charles Pugsley
John Gunner Warne, com-trav
Eliza L. Tripp, establishment for young ladies
John Adams

(Laura Place)

Major Campbell
John Ancrum
Thomas Brinsdon
Frederick Joseph Bissicks

John Newport, vict, Laura Tavern (pub) 1848 – 55. Reuben Nunn / 1857 – 58. George Gay / 1860 – 75. John Newport / 1876. Edwin Griffiths / 1877 to 1885. James Tombs 1886 to 1887. I. Feltham / 1888 – 89. John Feltham / 1891. Ann Chaddock / 1892 – 99. John Millman Bryan / 1901. A. Chaddock 1904 – 17. Thomas Marshall / 1921. Charles Lingard / 1925. Arthur Stevens / 1928 – 53. Gilbert Arnold.

(South Place)

George Beley, Oxford cottage
Elizabeth Miller
William Evans
J. Taylor
William Trott, coach builder

(Arlington Cottages)

William Hole
Elizabeth Wise

(Arlington Place)

Frederick Thomas Smith, vict, Black Swan (pub) (near Bedminster Bridge) 1837 – 39. J. Williams / 1840 to 1878. Frederick Smith / 1879. Elizabeth Smith / 1881 – 85. Clement Padfield / 1886 – 89. Maria Padfield 1891 – 1904. Caroline Louisa Padfield / 1906 – 09. Arthur Wyatt / 1914 – 17. Thomas Perks / 1921. Daniel Sixsmith.

Frederick William Pritchard, butter factor
Joseph King

(York Place)

Francis J. & George Harris, timber dealers
Emma Keith
Mrs Brain

(Harford Cottages)

Thomas Clements
Hannah Jones

Clarence Road, West Street to Lawrence Hill

Trinity Church, Vicar, Rev. David Cooper
H. G. Tapp, tailor and out-fitter
George Bryant, gas-fitter
E. Gravell, milliner & straw bonnet maker
Joseph Taylor, hair dresser
Edward J . Veale, loan office
William Jefferies, boot and shoe maker
William Smith
William H. Jacobs, surgeon
Thomas Masters, furniture broker
Henry Vaughan, greengrocer
John Player, grindery dealer
Daniel Lamb, confectioner
Henry Wedlake, cloth cutter
Elizabeth Wilkins, newsagent
Edwin Jacques, boot maker
George Spill, tallow chandler

James Barrell, vict, Black Moors‘ Head (pub) 1794 – 1800. Joseph Bird / 1806. Richard Harvey / 1820 – 23. Daniel Scrase / 1826 – 32. Nathaniel Stocker / 1837. Thomas James 1839 – 51. William Wilcox / 1852. Susan Wilcox / 1853 – 58. Samuel Smith / 1860 – 61. Mary Field / 1863. Joseph Wood 1867 – 68. J. Matthews / 1869 – 72. James Barrell / 1874. Henry Miller / 1875. Job Robins / 1876 to 1878. Hinley Ringland 1879 – 80. James Hooper / 1882 – 86. James Badman / 1887. George Francis / 1889. Sidney Skidmore / 1891 – 94. James Mountain 1896 – 97. Thomas Elbury / 1899 – 1906. Henry Hooper / 1909. Henry Withers / 1914 – 31. Edgar Griffiths / 1935. Ivy Stone 1937 – 38. William Rowles / 1939 to 1956. Ethel Williams the Blackmoor’s Head closed in 1956 becoming part of the shop next door.

Charles Llewellyn, van proprietor
Thomas Howse, fishmonger
Jabez Mountain, grocer
Abraham Batt, shoe maker, etc.

Charles Stooke, vict, Red Lion (pub) 1794. Robert Packer / 1800. Henry Millett / 1806 – 16. William Hitchcock / 1820. William Sheering / 1822. William Rossiter 1823 to 1852. George White / 1853 – 55. John Spiller / 1857 – 66. John White / 1867. Charles Welch / 1868 to 1871. Charles Stooke 1872 to 1878. Benjamin Sargeant / 1879 – 94. Samuel Mountain / 1896 – 1901. Harrison Leggott / 1904 – 09. James Hole 1914 – 31. John Jackson / 1934 – 38. James Alfred Jackson / 1944. George Ashdown / 1950 – 53. Mary A. Ashdown in 1934 the rent paid by James Jackson was £60 per annum, the landlords were The Bristol Brewery Georges & Co. Limited.

David Garner, iron last maker
Salome Williams, potato dealer
James Thomas, tallow chandler
Garton, Russell, & Co. brewers
Joseph Johnson, maltster and wine & spirit dealer
James Brown, hat and cap maker
Susan Corlett, grocer and tea dealer
John Blackmore, junr. baker
John Biggin, beer seller
Joseph Higgs, haberdasher, etc
James Thomas, tallow chandler
Edward Cleverley, pork butcher
Edgar Parry, chemist and druggist
Samuel Tucker, fancy stationer
Lewis and Dole, pork butchers
John Sale, clog manufacturer
Thomas Ford, butcher
Emanuel Shackson and Son, furniture hauliers, Clarence place
George Edwards, provision curer
William Rudd, greengrocer
William Horner, linen drapers, Manchester house
T. S. Silley, grocer & wine and spirit dealer
Thomas. P. Overbury, grocer & tea dealer
T Charles Packer, butcher
M. Naish, bakers
George Alway, wire worker china dealer
William Rose, marine store dealer
John Thosmas Isles, grocer and tea dealer
James Hurley, butcher
Edward Burr, tea & provision dealer
William Wilson, linen draper
Robert P. Buller, grocer
H. J . Crocker, corn and flour dealer
William Fox, Watch maker & toy dealer
Sophia Catford, plumber & gas-fitter

Clarence Row, Clarence Place, Kingsdown
.
Clarence Square, Prince Street, Bedminster

Clarence Street, Spring Street, New River

Clarence Town, top of West street

Clarendon Terrace, Bright Bow

Clark Street, Newfoundland Street to Water Street

Eli Slade, beer seller, King’s Arms (pub) 1837. Cornelius King / 1839 – 40. James Handsaker / 1842. George Wilkins / 1847 – 54. William Phipps / 1860. John Hucker 1861 to 1885. Eli Slade / 1886 – 96. Sidney Slade / 1899. William Clark / 1901. William Ford / 1904 – 09. Adelaide Victoria Jones 1914. Charles Hole / 1917 – 21. Thomas Evans / 1925 – 44. Lydia Hayward / 1950 – 60. George Boulter / 1975. F. A. P. Hoskins.

Mrs John Elson
Joseph Phillips, cooperage
Albert Taylor
Henry Hewett
John Patrick
James W. Pascoe, painter & glazier

Clark Street, Philip St. Bedminster, next the Chapel

Clark Street, Stapleton Road to Goodhind Street

Daniel Fugil, builder
William Spurrier
James Davis
William Wilcox
Frank J. Kent
Henry Heifer
George Carpenter, builder
James Lalle
Edwin Atterbury
William Lloyd
George Hole
George Alden
Agnes Goss
Giles Lewis
?. Shield
Edwin Rogers
Samuel H. Godfrey
Edwin Hazell
Albert Pullin
Samuel Webber
James Squiers
Edward Gough
William Norman
William Barnes
Samuel Thomas
Frederick Oaten

Clark Street, Barton Road to Batch, St. Phillip’s

S. Machin, jun. marine store dealer
Edwin Haskins, bird preserver
Richard Lewis, provision dealer
George Cox, mason and builder
Oliver Harris, pawnbroker
Walter Cox, carpenter and builder
Arthur Waine, grocer and baker

Clark’s Court, Clarence Road, West Street

Clayton Court, Horsefair

Clement Street, Becketts’ Fields, St Paul’s

Clevedon Terrace, Cotham Road to St. Matthew’s Road

Mrs Probert
Miss Williams
A. M. S. Giles
Miss Denyer
James Wood
Thomas Hankins
Miss Jane Codd

Clift Place, Guinea Street, Redcliff

Clifton Buildings, Upper Clifton Place, Stapleton Road

Clifton Court, Berkeley Place, Clifton

Clifton Down, Christ Church to Durdham Down

Observatory – Edwin West, artist

(Harley Place)

Rev. Henry Richards
Mrs John Henry Armstrong
Miss Mary Sheppard
Miss Eliza Dight
Rev. Charles Hill Wallace
Miss Elizabeth and Ann Harley
William Saltern, lodging house
Francis Nonus Budd, barrister
Robert Otter
Miss Charlotte Wilkins
Richard C. Hanson
Rev. George Maxwell
?. Innes
Miss S. Allen, Harley villa

(Litfield Place)

James Culverwell
Charles Thomas Alleyne
William Brook Addison
Miss Emma Cheshire, school
Lady Mackworth
Mrs Eliza Mary McBayne
John Hare
Rev. Arthur R. Ludlow, Alva house
Joseph D. Weston, Dorset house
Richard Drake, Camp house
William Smith, Sundon house
William Poole King, Avonside house
Mrs M. A. Butterworth, Crofton house
John Ware, Penavon
Edwin Harley, Chatford house
Mrs Marian Bettington, Fern house
Col. Edward Fitzgerald, Auckland house
William Henry Wills, Hawthornden
Charles Ward, Cecil house
?. Heathercliff
?. Birchfield
John Leonard Matthews, Auburn house
Joshua Saunders, manager of Bristol Branch Bank of England. Sutton house
Arthur John Knapp, Llanfoist house
The Misses Harris, Avondale house
John Shute, Glenavon house
Capt. Francis Philip Egerton, R.N. Eaton villa
Miss Louisa Errington, Trinmore house
Jesse Gouldsmith, Tellisford house
William Robert Worsley, Roxbourgh house
George Somerton, Hardelot villa

Clifton Down Road, Boyce’s Buildings to Christ Church Clifton

Clifton Grove, near Clifton Hill

Clifton Hill, Clifton Church to Lower Clifton Hill

Clifton Hill (Lower), Clifton Hill to Jacobs Wells

George N. Harris, jun. Clifton Hill cottage
Edward Tedder, registrar of births and deaths

Thomas Manley Knevett, vict, Clifton Rock Tavern (pub) No.2 Lower Clifton Hill, top of Constitution Hill. 1816 – 32. John Charles / 1833 – 40. Mrs. Charles / 1849 – 51. ? Sherris / 1853. William Silk / 1854 – 55. Henry Benmore 1856 – 59. George Palmer / 1861 – 69. Lewis Brown / 1869 – 72. Thomas Manley Knevett / 1874 – 77. George Gwinnett 1878. J. Whitmore / 1879. V. Down / 1882. W. Pidgeon / 1883 to 1886. Arthur Baker / 1887. Robert Wilson 1888 – 89. William H. England / 1891. Charles Giles / 1892. John Stone / 1894. Edwin Rogers / 1896. G. Newport / 1897. Sarah Langdon John Charles traded also as a grocer at this address.

Walter Marshall, butcher
Sam. Francis Rogers, coach smith
Charles Stopford, Rock house
Mrs Bond, milliner & dress maker, Rock cottage
Charles Vickery, Pembroke cottage
James Marks, Bellevue cottage
Edward Harse, carpenter, etc

Clifton Park, near Clifton Down

Rev. Alfred Highton, Dyrham lodge
Lionel O. Bigg, Bruton house
Mrs A. Knowlys, Clayton villa
Sir James Clerk, St. Vincent’s hall
Sir Charles Daniel Cave, Stoneleigh house
Mrs J. Abrahams, Wolverton house
John Harvey, Clifton park villa
Mrs C. B. Hare, Scantone house
Frederick Armitage, Fairlinch
Rev. Edward Young, M.A. Leny
Mrs Robt. Norris, Clifton Park house
Thomas Rodgers, Aldbourne villa
Miss L. Edwards, Pemberton house
Charles B. Hare, Clarence house
The Misses Taylor, Valetta lodge
Charles Ware, Glendower house
?. Sutherland house
J. Sear, Harley house
Robert Young, Hereford house
Charles Wheeler, Penrose cottage
Miss Jones, Harley cottage
Rev. William James, Harley lodge
Christ Church
William Monckton, Amherst house
Edward Slaughter, Colchester house
William Wright, Northcott house
Mrs Dan. H. Collings, Clifton Park lodge
Lady Harding, Deepholm
James Lane, florist, Manilla cottage
G. Dolman, livery stables, Clifton park mews

Clifton Park Road, Clifton Park to College Road, West

Rev. Thomas William Hobson, Ellesmere house
Benjamin Teacher
Mrs Vauglnall Fox
Miss Catherine Williams
Mary Stedder
Mrs Mears

(Sutherland Villas)

Mrs Barnard, Salisbury lodge
Mrs Ship
Alfred Tilley
Alfred Richard Bateman
Mrs Sholto Douglas
T. Lane
Charles Henry Newmarch
George Davis
Capt. Henry David Rowe
Robert Tucker Plumb
William Goodbey, Avondale lodge

Clifton Place, Clifton Road

See Below

Clifton Place, Stapleton Road to Easton Road

Clifton Road, Victoria Square (top of Queen’s Road) to Clifton Down

(York Buildings)

Rev. Clement D. Strong
William M. Clarke, surgeon
Sidney Dodge, fruiterer and green-grocer
Charles Butson, livery stables, Richmond mews
Robert Iles, greengrocer
Robert Keevil, chemist and druggist
Robert Maynard, fruiterer and greengrocer
Mrs Mood dress and mantle maker
Thomas Bamfield, junr. grocer

(Clifton Place)

William Thatcher, poulterer
Samuel Payton, tailor and draper
George Davie, ironmonger
May Bell, grocers
Matthew Dowling, butcher
Thomas Bamfield & Son, bakers, etc.

(Clifton Hill)

Rev. Thomas George Smith, Richmond house
John A. Symonds, M.D. Clifton hill house
Joseph H. Nash
Lewis Fry, Goldney house
Miss Susannah Sadler, ladies school, Clifton grove house
Charles J. Collins Prichard, Clifton grove

(Regent Street)

Mrs Gaskin, ladies’ boarding school, Clifton house

(Belmont)

Mrs M. A. Palmer, china & glass dealer
Mrs Lancaster, bookseller
Mrs A. Whelan, grocer
Henry Criddle
Stephen J. Adams, seedsman
John Kingcombe, silk mercer

(Quadrant)

Charles Tovey and Co. wine & spirit merchants

(Rodney Place)

Ebenezer Austin, Clifton Chronicle
Col. Robert Bush
Mrs Martha Smith
Miss Akerman
Mrs Ann Waddington
Miss Louisa Townsend
Miss S. A. Kington
Misses Emily and Fanny May, ladies’ boarding school

(Rodney Cottages)

Thomas Canning, Rodney house
Morgan Thomas, lodging houses
Mrs Georgiana Guest

(Clifton Down Road)

Jesse Carter, lodging house, Urch’s cottage
Charles T. Hudson, L.L.D. Manilla hall
Mrs Mary Ann Beloe, Rodney lodge
Misses Cort and Bulkley, school,
Duncan house
Thomas Todd Walton, Mortimer house

(Boyce’s Buildings)

Mrs Ann Prout, lodging house
Mrs. Woodhouse, lodging house
Major Penny
Mrs and Miss Fisher
Thomas Brown, private boarding house
Joseph Chard, back of buildings

(Regent Street)

Samuel Moore, ironmonger and bright smith
John Bolling, confectioner, Fielding house
Edward Harrison, music warehouse, Regent house
Miss Mills, juvenile outfitter
Mrs H. G. Camp, Berlin repository
Miss Howell, dress and mantle maker
Miss Ball, dress and mantle maker
Sidney Righton, bookseller, and registry office for servants
Miss Ellis, dressmaker
Henry Massingham, boot maker
John Gill, ironmonger
George F. Schacht, chemist &; druggist
West of England & South Wales District Bank
Thomas A. Warren, cook, confectioner & wine merchant
Francis S. Toplis
Post Office
John Cordeaux, hosier and haberdasher
Lewis & Sons, house & estate agents
Paul Co. wine merchants
Mrs H. Paul, Saville cottage
James Winscombe, boot maker,
Saville house

(Clifton Hill)

Major General Henry Lechmere Worrall, Clifton cottage
William Jenkins, L.L.D. Clifton court
James D. Tanner, livery stables
J. D. Tanner, Clifton retreat
The Misses Davies, lodging house, Prospect house
Henry Brown, lodging house
Francis William Fox
Edward Long Fox, M.D. Church house

www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/5175075854/in/photolis…

(Clifton Place)

William Chant, lodging house
Willey and Davis, milliners
?. Sharland, jeweller, etc.

S. Badcock, vict, King’s Arms Hotel (pub) 1856 – 63. Frederick Smith / 1869. S. Palmer / 1871 – 74. S. Badcock / 1875 to 1876. Charles Millard / 1877. Lewis Samuels 1878. R. Bizley / 1882. T. Baker / 1883. G. Bowden / 1885. Henry Anthony / 1886. E. K. Everett / 1887. George Lewin 1889. Emily Hilton / 1891 – 94. John Dodd / 1896. Miss. E. Sheppard / 1897. Henry Wiseman / 1899. Charles Collins 1901. Muriel Collins / 1904 – 06. Frederick Tichbon / 1909. Charles Spencer.

(Manor Buildings)

Mrs Symes, milliner and dress maker
James Pleass, carpenter, undertaker. etc.
George Saltford, fruiterer
Charles Boniface, Manor House wine & spirit vaults
Joseph H. Clay, baker
Edward James Grubb, blind maker

George Pitman, vict, Lansdown Hotel (pub) bristolslostpubs.eu/page332.html

Edward Garland, shop keeper
William Gerrish, fly prop. Alma mews
George Nelson Harris, builder, etc.
John Stephens, carpenter, etc.

Clifton Street, Clifton Place to Beaufort St. Stapleton Rd

James Hoskins, grocer
Harry Boulton, beer ret
Stephen Davis, grocer
John Simmons, grocer
Robert Edbrooke, cooper
James George, bookseller

Clifton Vale, Lower Crescent to Hotwell Road

Mrs Clement Baber, Elm cottage
John Lavars
Mrs. Ann Lewis Woodman
William Baynton
Mrs Henry Waldo
Mrs Harriet Draper
Rev Joseph Laurie, D.D.
Rev. Charles J . Senior
Rev. William Lawrence, M.A.
John Lawrence, surgeon
Richard Shilstone
Thomas Howard, civil engineer
Rev. ?. Hutton
Mrs. Alfred Day
Capt. Anthony H. Cock
Mrs Mary Jeffery
Mrs Sarah Jones
Mrs Hurn

Clifton View, Victoria Road, Bedminster

William H. Rider
William Vincent
?. Frayley, commercial traveller
Alexander Adams
Emma Goldsworthy, ladies’ school
Elizabeth Durstone
John Vincent
Henry Matthews, Clifton view cottage

Clifton Wood, South of Clifton Church

Henry Robins, Colston cottage
Ambrose Coombs, Beaven cottage
Charles Bevan
Daniel Haythorne Goolden
H. Newman, Beaufort house
Clifton Wood Convent, Madame Lefevre, lady superior
Miss Mary Shephard, Clifton Wood house
H. Hucker, Glentworth villa
The Misses Kidd, Llanaway villa
F. Slade, contractor, Freshford villa
Joseph B. Brain, Montague villa
James Harry Sheppard, M.A. Montague villa
W. Fiddes, Clifton villa
H. C. Dowson, Broomfield villa
Charles Grenville, gardener, Ivy cottage
James Rowe, carpenter
Mrs H. Lewis
Rev. Henry Frewer
Mrs Golding
Mrs Ferris
Mrs Phillips
George Nelson Harris, Clifton hill cottage

Clifton Wood Crescent, Clifton Wood

Albert Thorn
Miss E. Lewis, dressmaker
George Merriman
Charles Oatway, plasterer
William H. Verney, carpenter
Robert Burman
John Beer
Thomas Goss, carpenter
Henry Saunders
Valentine Down, gardener
Capt. George Dando
George Carey
Thomas Phillips
L. White, plasterer
Harry Nicholas
W. Dyer
James W. Bellamy
Edward H. Harris
John Biggs
Charles Witchel
William Webber
Charles Rogers
Abraham Sage
Solomon Sayer
Harry Symons
John Tanner
E. Middleditch
Joseph Owner
John Ponting
John Brewer
Thomas Oatway, greengrocer & beer retail
Richard Hollister
John Jones
William James Buck
William J . Brice

Clifton Wood Terrace, Hillside to Hotwell Road

James N. Smith, The Lodge
Samuel A. Clements
Isaac Eglestaff
Thomas Eglestaff

Cloisters, Lower College Green

Clyde Cottages, Clyde Road, Redland Park

Mrs Frederick Norton, professor of music
Mrs Harriet Willings
Richard Chandler

Clyde Road, Whiteladies Road to Lower Redland Road

Capt. Gimblett
Miss Cummings, Roden villa
William Maule
William Perry, Richmond lodge
James Dix, Wickmere lodge
Mrs Luke
Mrs Burrell
Henry Cole Silk, Dover villa
?. Trapnell
Mrs. Fry, Villa St. Denis
Capt. George Davies, Rodee villa
Mrs House

(Wordsworth Terrace)

John Slater Porter
Alfred William Compton
William Benjamin Clarke, Stanley villa
Joshua Taylor
John Taylor, Wordsworth villa
Mrs Harris, Rydal villa
Thomas Garlike, Grasmere villa
Walter Pigeon, Langdale villa
Joseph H. Perry, Kirkstone villa
Moss Cohen, Fern villa
Rev James Adam Clarke, Sarnia villa
S. J . Moulton, Llancoorie villa
Dr. Henry Pidgeon, Onondaga villa
William B. Buzzard, Leighton villa
William Stuart Findlater, Rozel lodge
Samuel Ware, Clyde brow
Mrs Mayor, Boswell villa
C. H. Lane, Spernon villa
W. H. R. Townsend, Cronstadt villa
Martha Fisher
Mrs Batt, laundress
Joseph Newton, Hampton dairy

Clyde Villas, Clyde Road

William Charles Halcomb
James Lyde
William Pockson, junr.
George Curtis, M.D.

CO – Bristol Street Directory 1871

1966 The Who Live, Locarno Ballroom, Bristol
gay hotel berlin
Image by brizzle born and bred
The Who Live In Concert at The Locarno Ballroom, Frogmore Street, New Bristol Centre. 1966

Did anyone Attend this Concert?

See page links below

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/3713291595/

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2094845159/

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/3713291787/

The Who UK Tour 1966

January 1st, 1966
Trade Union Hall, Watford

January 2nd, 1966
Ultra Club, Downs Hotele, Hassocks

January 7th, 1966
Mister McCoys, Middlesbrough

January 8th, 1966
Jigsaw Club, Manchester

January 9th, 1966
Cosmopolitan Club, Carlisle

January 13th, 1966
Ritz Ballroom, Skewen, Wales

January 13th, 1966
Regal Ballroom, Ammanford, Wales

January 14th, 1966
Municipal Hall, Pontypridd, Wales

January 15th, 1966
Two Puddings Club, Stratford, East London

January 15th, 1966
The In Crowd Club, Hackney, East London

January 16th, 1966
Agincourt Ballroom, Camberley

January 21st, 1966
Glenlyn Ballroom, Forest Hill

January 22nd, 1966
The Adelphi, West Bromwich

January 22nd, 1966
The Baths, Smethwick

January 23rd, 1966
The Co-Op, Warrington

January 26th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Stevenage

January 28th, 1966
Birmingham University, Birmingham

January 29th, 1966
Imperial Ballroom, Nelson

January 30th, 1966
Beachcomber Club, Leigh

January 31st, 1966
Coed Eva Community College, Cwmbran, Wales

February 1st, 1966
Britannia Rowing Club, Nottingham

February 4th, 1966
Astoria Theatre, Finsbury Park, North London

February 5th, 1966
Odeon Theatre, Southend-on-Sea

February 6th, 1966
Empire Theatre, Liverpool

February 11th, 1966
The Palais, Wimbledon, South London

February 12th, 1966
Dreamland Ballroom, Margate

February 13th, 1966
Community Centre, Southall, West London

February 14th, 1966
Liverpool University, Liverpool

February 14th, 1966
Liverpool University, Liverpool

February 15th, 1966
Esquire Club, Sheffield

February 16th, 1966
Beachcomber Club, Bolton

February 17th, 1966
Club A Go-Go, Newcastle

February 18th, 1966
Volunteer Hall, Galashiels, Scotland

February 19th, 1966
Memorial Hall, Northwich

February 20th, 1966
Oasis Club, Manchester

February 21st, 1966
Beachcomber Club, Preston

February 21st, 1966
Beachcomber Club, Preston

February 25th, 1966
Majestic Ballroom, Wellington

February 28th, 1966
Eltham Baths, Eltham Hill, South London

February 28th, 1966
Eltham Baths, Eltham Hill, South London

March 2nd, 1966
Wolsey Hall, Cheshunt

March 3rd, 1966
Victoria Ballroom, Chesterfield

March 4th, 1966
Social Club, Pontypool, Wales

March 5th, 1966
Marcam Hall, March

March 9th, 1966
Town Hall, Farnborough

March 10th, 1966
Ram Jam Club, Brixton

March 11th, 1966
The Cavern Club, London

March 12th, 1966
The Birdcage, Portsmouth

March 13th, 1966
Starlite Ballroom, Greenford

March 18th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Basildon

March 19th, 1966
King’s Hall, Stoke-on-Trent

March 23rd, 1966
Tower Ballroom, Great Yarmouth

March 24th, 1966
Starlight Ballroom, Crawley

March 25th, 1966
Corn Exchange, Hertford

March 26th, 1966
St. George’s Ballroom, Hinckley

March 27th, 1966
Central Pier, Morecambe

April 2nd, 1966
La Locomotive Club, Paris

April 8th, 1966
Queen’s Hall, Leeds

April 9th, 1966
Pavilion Ballroom, Buxton

April 14th, 1966
Gaumont Cinema, Southampton

April 15th, 1966
Fairfield Halls, Croydon

April 16th, 1966
Odeon Cinema, Watford

April 17th, 1966
Regal Cinema, Edmonton, North London

April 19th, 1966
Town Hall, Walsall

April 21st, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Stevenage

April 22nd, 1966
Odeon Cinema, Derby

April 23rd, 1966
Odeon Cinema, Rochester

April 24th, 1966
Birmingham Theatre, Birmingham

April 25th, 1966
The Pavilion, Bath

April 25th, 1966
The Pavilion, Bath

April 26th, 1966
Links Club, Boreham Wood

April 28th, 1966
The Witchdoctor, Savoy Rooms, Catford

April 29th, 1966
Tiles Club, London

April 30th, 1966
Corn Exchange, Chelmsford

May 1st, 1966
NME Poll Winners‘ Concert, Empire Pool, Wembley

May 4th, 1966
Town Hall, Stourbridge

May 5th, 1966
Town Hall, Kidderminster

May 6th, 1966
Top Hat Ballroom, Lisburn

May 7th, 1966
National Stadium, Dublin

May 8th, 1966
Arcadia Ballroom, Cork

May 11th, 1966
Corn Exchange, Bristol

May 12th, 1966
The Pavilion, Worthing

May 13th, 1966
The Palais, Wimbledon, South London

May 14th, 1966
The Palais, Bury

May 20th, 1966
Ricky Tick Club, Newbury

May 21st, 1966
Floral Hall, Southport

May 23rd, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Blackburn

May 23rd, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Blackburn

May 26th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Ashton-under-Lyne

May 27th, 1966
Granby Halls, Leicester

May 28th, 1966
South Pier, Blackpool

May 29th, 1966
Winter Gardens, Morecambe

May 30th, 1966
Sincil Bank Football Ground, Lincoln

June 2nd, 1966
Grona Lund, Stockholm

June 3rd, 1966
Liljekonvaljeholmen – Club 66, Uppsala

June 3rd, 1966
Kungsparken, Kungsor

June 4th, 1966
Berget, Soderhamn

June 4th, 1966
Hogbo Bruk, Sandviken

June 5th, 1966
Club Nycklen 65, Nykoping

June 5th, 1966
Club Nycklens, Orebro

June 7th, 1966
Tivoli Hit House, Copenhagen

June 7th, 1966
Fyens Forum, Odense

June 16th, 1966
Hull University, Hull

June 17th, 1966
City Halls, Perth, Scotland

June 18th, 1966
Market Hall, Carlisle

June 20th, 1966
Gay Tower Ballroom, Birmingham

June 21st, 1966
Winter Gardens, Malvern

June 23rd, 1966
University Refectory, Leeds

June 24th, 1966
Salisbury University, Salisbury

June 25th, 1966
College of Further Education, Chichester

June 26th, 1966
Britannia Pier Theatre, Great Yarmouth

July 4th, 1966
Marina Ballroom, Ramsgate

July 7th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Streatham

July 8th, 1966
Top Rank Ballroom, Cardiff, Wales

July 9th, 1966
Technical College, Westminster

July 14th, 1966
Liberal Hall, Yeovil

July 15th, 1966
Starlite Ballroom, Greenford

July 16th, 1966
Civic Hall, Barnsley

July 21st, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Bristol

July 22nd, 1966
Central Pier, Morecambe

July 23rd, 1966
Spa Royal Hall, Bridlington

July 27th, 1966
Flamingo Ballroom, Redruth

July 28th, 1966
Queen’s Hall, Barnstaple

July 29th, 1966
Tiles Club, London

July 30th, 1966
Sixth National Jazz & Blues Festival, Windsor Race, Windsor

August 18th, 1966
The Palace Ballroom, Douglas, Isle of Man

August 20th, 1966
Town Hall, Torquay

August 21st, 1966
Pier Ballroom, Hastings

August 23rd, 1966
Sherwood Rooms, Nottingham

August 24th, 1966
Orchid Ballroom, Purley

August 25th, 1966
Dreamland Ballroom, Margate

August 25th, 1966
Royal Hall, Harrogate

September 1st, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Coventry

September 2nd, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Basildon

September 3rd, 1966
Drill Hall, Grantham

September 6th, 1966
The Palais, Ilford, Essex

September 6th, 1966
The Palais, Ilford, Essex

September 7th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Stevenage

September 9th, 1966
Pier Pavilion, Felixstowe

September 10th, 1966
Corn Exchange, Bedford

September 11th, 1966
Downs Hotel, Hassocks

September 15th, 1966
Gaumont Cinema, Hanley

September 16th, 1966
Odeon Cinema, Derby

October 1st, 1966
Imperial Ballroom, Nelson

October 10th, 1966
The Pavilion, Bath

October 12th, 1966
Club 192, Casino Oberbayern, The Hague

October 14th, 1966
Queen’s Hall, Leeds

October 15th, 1966
Corn Exchange, Chelmsford

October 20th, 1966
Herlev Hallen, Copenhagen

October 21st, 1966
Liseberg Konserthallen, Gothenburg

October 22nd, 1966
Jagersbo-Hoor, Hoor

October 22nd, 1966
Gislovs Stjarna, Simrishamn

October 23rd, 1966
MFF-Stadion, Malmo

October 23rd, 1966
Fyens Forum, Odense

October 24th, 1966
Folkparken, Halmstad

October 25th, 1966
Club Nalen, Stockholm

October 28th, 1966
Palais d’Hiver, Lyon

October 30th, 1966
Sportpalast, Berlin

November 4th, 1966
Stapthalle, Kassel

November 5th, 1966
Messehalle, Saarbrücken

November 6th, 1966
Kongresshalle, Cologne

November 7th, 1966
Rheinhalle, Düsseldorf

November 12th, 1966
Duke of York’s Barracks, Chelsea, London

November 18th, 1966
City Halls, Perth, Scotland

November 19th, 1966
Market Hall, Carlisle

November 24th, 1966
The Pavilion, Worthing

November 26th, 1966
Spa Royal Hall, Bridlington

November 29th, 1966
Winter Gardens, Malvern

December 3rd, 1966
Midnight City, Birmingham

December 9th, 1966
Drill Hall, Dumfries, Scotland

December 10th, 1966
Empire Theatre, Sunderland

December 15th, 1966
Locarno Ballroom, Streatham

December 17th, 1966
Imperial Ballroom, Nelson

December 21st, 1966
Upper Cut Club, Forest Gate, East London

December 30th, 1966
Baths Hall, Cheam

December 31st, 1966
The Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, North London

Ich möchte Sie besuchen!: Das kleine Buch für den ehrenamtlichen Besuchsdienst in Krankenhäusern und Altenheimen

Ich möchte Sie besuchen!: Das kleine Buch für den ehrenamtlichen Besuchsdienst in Krankenhäusern und Altenheimen

Ich möchte Sie besuchen!: Das kleine Buch für den ehrenamtlichen Besuchsdienst in Krankenhäusern und Altenheimen

List Price: EUR 9,90

Price: EUR 9,90

F1 – 06

F1 - 06

Ob im Rennsitz oder in der Rolle des Chefingenieurs:FORMEL EINS 2006 bedeutet schwere Boliden, hohe Geschwindigkeit aber auch taktisches Fingerspitzengefühl – unterstützt den online Modus – USK: k.A.

List Price: EUR 45,99

Price: EUR 45,99

Find More Berlin Besuchen Tipps Products

Eastside Gallery

Some cool plus berlin friedrichshain images:

Eastside Gallery
plus berlin friedrichshain
Image by Walt Jabsco
The East Side Gallery is an international memorial for freedom. It is a 1.3 km long section of the Berlin Wall located near the centre of Berlin on Mühlenstraße in Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg. The actual border at this point was the river Spree. The gallery is located on the so-called "hinterland mauer", which closed the border to East Berlin.

The Gallery consists of 105 paintings by artists from all over the world, painted in 1990 on the east side of the Berlin Wall. The East Side Gallery was founded following the successful merger of the two German artists‘ associations VBK and BBK. The founding members were the speche of the Federal Association of Artists BBK Bodo Sperling, Barbara Greul Aschanta, Jörg Kubitzki and David Monti.

It is possibly the largest and longest-lasting open air gallery in the world. Paintings from Jürgen Grosse alias INDIANO, Dimitri Vrubel, Siegfrid Santoni, Bodo Sperling, Kasra Alavi, Kani Alavi, Jim Avignon, Thierry Noir, Ingeborg Blumenthal, Ignasi Blanch i Gisbert, Kim Prisu, Hervé Morlay VR and others have followed.

The paintings at the East Side Gallery document a time of change and express the euphoria and great hopes for a better, more free future for all people of the world.

In July 2006, to facilitate access to the River Spree from O2 World, a 40 meter section was moved somewhat west, parallel to the original position.

A 23 meter section was scheduled to be removed on March 1, 2013, to make way for luxury apartments. None of the artists whose work will be destroyed were informed of these plans. The demolition work actually started on March 1, 2013. According to German news FOCUS, authorities were not aware of the start of the demolition. Due to the involvement of protesters, demolition was postponed until at least March 18, 2013.

Two-thirds of the paintings are badly damaged by erosion, graffiti, and vandalism. One-third have been restored by a non-profit organization which started work in 2000. The objective of this organization is the eventual restoration and preservation of all the paintings. Full restoration, particularly of the central sections, was projected for 2008. Remediation began in May 2009.

The restoration process has been marked by major conflict. Eight of the artists of 1990 refused to paint their own images again after they were completely destroyed by the renovation. In order to defend the copyright, they founded "Founder Initiative East Side" with other artists whose images were simply copied without permission. Bodo Sperling launched a test case in the Berlin State Court in May 2011, represented by the Munich art lawyer Hannes Hartung and with the support of the German VG Bild-Kunst. The Court will address the question of whether art should be listed as destroyed and then re-copied without the respective artists‘ permission. The outcome of the trial will be a landmark declaration for European art law.

Source: Wikipedia

199-21 · Berlin
plus berlin friedrichshain
Image by Danipuntocom
Ilford HP5 Plus 400 pushed to 1600
Ilford Microphen, stock, 11 min, 23°

Nikon F2
Nikkor AI 24mm ƒ/2.8

Epson V500

Urban Spree, Friedrichshain.
plus berlin friedrichshain
Image by Bricovoyage
Street art in Berlin.
Urban Spree, Friedrichshain.

Pour plus d’infos sur le street art à Berlin, consulter notre site:
www.bricovoyage.com/into-the-town/rando-urbaine/rando-str…

Nice Post Lichtenberg Berlin photos

Some cool post lichtenberg berlin images:

Berlin – S-Bahnhof Storkower Straße
post lichtenberg berlin
Image by IngolfBLN
Ringbahn – Linien S41, S42, S8 – zur Zeit auch S9 und vielleicht auch mal wieder S85

Berlin – S-Bahnhof Storkower Straße
post lichtenberg berlin
Image by IngolfBLN
Ringbahn – Linien S41, S42, S8 – zur Zeit auch S9 und vielleicht auch mal wieder S85

pfaehle
post lichtenberg berlin
Image by peterulrich.net | Berlin Webdesigner

Berlin in den 1920er-Jahren Reviews

Berlin in den 1920er-Jahren

Berlin in den 1920er-Jahren

Broschiertes Buch
Berlin in den 1920ern, eine Dekade, in der die deutsche Hauptstadt eine moderne, von Fortschritt und Freiheit berauschte Weltstadt war und zum Sehnsuchtsort hedonistischer Fantasien wurde. Ein Streifzug durch eine Epoche der kulturellen Blüte, des intellektuellen Reichtums und der exzessiven Lebenslust.

List Price: EUR 9,99

Price: EUR 9,99

2 Stück Negative gerahmt 50 mm/50 mm , Berlin am Alexanderplatz

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BERLIN Alexanderplatz S-Bahnhof Kaufhaus Wertheim Straßenbahn 1937
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Berlin

Check out these crash berlin images:

Berlin
crash berlin
Image by Sólo J
The camp was established in 1936. It was located north of Berlin, which gave it a primary position among the German concentration camps: the administrative centre of all concentration camps was located in Oranienburg, and Sachsenhausen became a training centre for Schutzstaffel (SS) officers (who would often be sent to oversee other camps afterwards). Executions took place at Sachsenhausen, especially those that were Soviet Prisoners of War. Some Jews were executed at Sachsenhausen and many died there, the Jewish inmates of the camp were relocated to Auschwitz in 1942. Sachsenhausen was not intended as an extermination camp — instead, the systematic mass murder of Jews was conducted in camps to the east. However, many died as a result of executions, casual brutality and the poor living conditions and treatment.

Sachsenhausen was intended to set a standard for other concentration camps, both in its design and the treatment of prisoners. The camp perimeter is, approximately, an equilateral triangle with a semi circular roll call area centred on the main entrance gate in the side running northeast to southwest. Barrack huts lay beyond the roll call area, radiating from the gate. The layout was intended to allow the machine gun post in the entrance gate to dominate the camp but in practice it was necessary to add additional watchtowers to the perimeter.

The standard barrack layout was two accommodation areas linked by common storage, washing and storage areas. Heating was minimal. Each day, time to get up, wash, use the toilet and eat was very limited in the crowded facilities.

There was an infirmary inside the southern angle of the perimeter and a camp prison within the eastern angle. There was also a camp kitchen and a camp laundry. The camp’s capacity became inadequate and the camp was extended in 1938 by a new rectangular area (the "small camp") north east of the entrance gate and the perimeter wall was altered to enclose it. There was an additional area (sonder lager) outside the main camp perimeter to the north; this was built in 1941 for special prisoners that the regime wished to isolate.

An industrial area, outside the western camp perimeter, contained SS workshops in which prisoners were forced to work; those unable to work had to stand to attention for the duration of the working day. Heinkel, the aircraft manufacturer, was a major user of Sachsenhausen labour, using between 6000 and 8000 prisoners on their He 177 bomber. Although official German reports claimed "The prisoners are working without fault", some of these aircraft crashed unexpectedly around Stalingrad and it’s suspected that prisoners had sabotaged them. [1] Other firms included AEG.

Plaque to honour over 100 Dutch resistance fighters executed at Sachsenhausen.Later, part of the industrial area was used for "Station Z", where executions took place and a new crematorium was built, when the first camp crematorium could no longer cope with the number of corpses. The executions were done in a trench, either by shooting or by hanging. Amongst those executed were the commandos from Operation Musketoon and the Grand Prix motor racing champion, William Grover-Williams, also John Godwin RNVR, a British Naval Sub-Lieutenant who managed to shoot dead the commander of his execution party, for which he was mentioned in despatches posthumously. Over 100 Dutch resistance fighters were executed at Sachsenhausen.

The camp was secure and there were few successful escapes. The perimeter consisted of a three metre high wall on the outside. Within that there was a path used by guards and dogs; it was bordered on the inside by a lethal electric fence; inside that was a "death strip" forbidden to the prisoners. Any prisoner venturing onto the "death strip" would be shot by the guards without warning.

Arbeit Macht Frei gateOn the front entrance gates to Sachsenhausen is the infamous slogan Arbeit Macht Frei (German: "Work Makes [You] Free"). About 200,000 people passed through Sachsenhausen between 1936 and 1945. Some 100,000 inmates died there from exhaustion, disease, malnutrition or pneumonia from the freezing winter cold. Many were executed or died as the result of brutal medical experimentation. According to an article published on December 13, 2001 in The New York Times, "In the early years of the war the SS practiced methods of mass killing there that were later used in the Nazi death camps. Of the roughly 30,000 wartime victims at Sachsenhausen, most were Russian prisoners of war, among them Joseph Stalin’s eldest son (Yakov Dzhugashvili).[2]

The wife and children of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria, members of the Wittelsbach family, were held in the camp from October 1944 to April 1945, before being transferred to the Dachau concentration camp. Reverend Martin Niemöller, a critic of the Nazis and author of the poem First they came…, was also a prisoner at the camp. Herschel Grynszpan, whose act of assassination was used by Joseph Goebbels to initiate the Kristallnacht pogrom, was moved in and out of Sachshausen since his capture on the 18th July 1940 and until September 1940 when he was moved to Magdeburg.[3] Ukrainian nationalist leader Stepan Bandera was imprisoned there until October 1944, and two of his brothers died there.

On September 15 1939, August Dickman, a German Jehovah’s Witness, was publicly shot as a result of his conscientious objection to joining the armed forces. The SS had expected his death to persuade fellow Witnesses to abandon their own refusals and to show rspect for camp rules and authorities. It failed; the others enthusiastically refused to back down and begged to be martyred also. [4]

Sachsenhausen was the site of the largest counterfeiting operation ever. The Nazis forced Jewish artisans to produce forged American and British currency, as part of a plan to undermine the British and United States‘ economies, courtesy of Sicherheitsdienst (SD) chief Reinhard Heydrich. Over one billion pounds in counterfeited banknotes was recovered. The Germans introduced fake British £5, £10, £20 and £50 notes into circulation in 1943: the Bank of England never found them. Today, these notes are considered very valuable by collectors.

Many women were among the inmates of Sachsenhausen and its subcamps. According to SS files, more than 2,000 women lived in Sachsenhausen, guarded by female SS staff (Aufseherin). Camp records show that there was one male SS soldier for every ten inmates and for every ten male SS there was a woman SS. Several subcamps for women were established in Berlin, including in Neukolln.

Camp punishments could be harsh. Some would be required to assume the "Sachsenhausen salute" where a prisoner would squat with his arms outstretched in front. There was a marching strip around the perimeter of the roll call ground, where prisoners had to march over a variety of surfaces, to test military footwear; between 25 and 40 kilometres were covered each day. Prisoners assigned to the camp prison would be kept in isolation on poor rations and some would be suspended from posts by their wrists tied behind their backs (strappado). In cases such as attempted escape, there would a public hanging in front of the assembled prisoners.

With the advance of the Red Army in the spring of 1945, Sachsenhausen was prepared for evacuation. On April 20–21, the camp’s SS staff ordered 33,000 inmates on a forced march westward. Most of the prisoners were physically exhausted and thousands did not survive this death march; those who collapsed en route were shot by the SS. On April 22, 1945, the camp’s remaining 3,000 inmates, including 1,400 women were liberated by the Red Army and Polish 2nd Infantry Division of Ludowe Wojsko Polskie.

It’s estimated that 200,000 people passed thrugh Sachsenhausen concentration camp and that 100,000 died.

Berlin
crash berlin
Image by Sólo J
The death marches refer to the forcible movement in the winter of 1944-45 by Nazi Germany of thousands of prisoners, mostly Jews, from German concentration camps near the war front to camps inside Germany.

The camp was established in 1936. It was located north of Berlin, which gave it a primary position among the German concentration camps: the administrative centre of all concentration camps was located in Oranienburg, and Sachsenhausen became a training centre for Schutzstaffel (SS) officers (who would often be sent to oversee other camps afterwards). Executions took place at Sachsenhausen, especially those that were Soviet Prisoners of War. Some Jews were executed at Sachsenhausen and many died there, the Jewish inmates of the camp were relocated to Auschwitz in 1942. Sachsenhausen was not intended as an extermination camp — instead, the systematic mass murder of Jews was conducted in camps to the east. However, many died as a result of executions, casual brutality and the poor living conditions and treatment.

Sachsenhausen was intended to set a standard for other concentration camps, both in its design and the treatment of prisoners. The camp perimeter is, approximately, an equilateral triangle with a semi circular roll call area centred on the main entrance gate in the side running northeast to southwest. Barrack huts lay beyond the roll call area, radiating from the gate. The layout was intended to allow the machine gun post in the entrance gate to dominate the camp but in practice it was necessary to add additional watchtowers to the perimeter.

The standard barrack layout was two accommodation areas linked by common storage, washing and storage areas. Heating was minimal. Each day, time to get up, wash, use the toilet and eat was very limited in the crowded facilities.

There was an infirmary inside the southern angle of the perimeter and a camp prison within the eastern angle. There was also a camp kitchen and a camp laundry. The camp’s capacity became inadequate and the camp was extended in 1938 by a new rectangular area (the "small camp") north east of the entrance gate and the perimeter wall was altered to enclose it. There was an additional area (sonder lager) outside the main camp perimeter to the north; this was built in 1941 for special prisoners that the regime wished to isolate.

An industrial area, outside the western camp perimeter, contained SS workshops in which prisoners were forced to work; those unable to work had to stand to attention for the duration of the working day. Heinkel, the aircraft manufacturer, was a major user of Sachsenhausen labour, using between 6000 and 8000 prisoners on their He 177 bomber. Although official German reports claimed "The prisoners are working without fault", some of these aircraft crashed unexpectedly around Stalingrad and it’s suspected that prisoners had sabotaged them. [1] Other firms included AEG.

Plaque to honour over 100 Dutch resistance fighters executed at Sachsenhausen.Later, part of the industrial area was used for "Station Z", where executions took place and a new crematorium was built, when the first camp crematorium could no longer cope with the number of corpses. The executions were done in a trench, either by shooting or by hanging. Amongst those executed were the commandos from Operation Musketoon and the Grand Prix motor racing champion, William Grover-Williams, also John Godwin RNVR, a British Naval Sub-Lieutenant who managed to shoot dead the commander of his execution party, for which he was mentioned in despatches posthumously. Over 100 Dutch resistance fighters were executed at Sachsenhausen.

The camp was secure and there were few successful escapes. The perimeter consisted of a three metre high wall on the outside. Within that there was a path used by guards and dogs; it was bordered on the inside by a lethal electric fence; inside that was a "death strip" forbidden to the prisoners. Any prisoner venturing onto the "death strip" would be shot by the guards without warning.

Arbeit Macht Frei gateOn the front entrance gates to Sachsenhausen is the infamous slogan Arbeit Macht Frei (German: "Work Makes [You] Free"). About 200,000 people passed through Sachsenhausen between 1936 and 1945. Some 100,000 inmates died there from exhaustion, disease, malnutrition or pneumonia from the freezing winter cold. Many were executed or died as the result of brutal medical experimentation. According to an article published on December 13, 2001 in The New York Times, "In the early years of the war the SS practiced methods of mass killing there that were later used in the Nazi death camps. Of the roughly 30,000 wartime victims at Sachsenhausen, most were Russian prisoners of war, among them Joseph Stalin’s eldest son (Yakov Dzhugashvili).[2]

The wife and children of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria, members of the Wittelsbach family, were held in the camp from October 1944 to April 1945, before being transferred to the Dachau concentration camp. Reverend Martin Niemöller, a critic of the Nazis and author of the poem First they came…, was also a prisoner at the camp. Herschel Grynszpan, whose act of assassination was used by Joseph Goebbels to initiate the Kristallnacht pogrom, was moved in and out of Sachshausen since his capture on the 18th July 1940 and until September 1940 when he was moved to Magdeburg.[3] Ukrainian nationalist leader Stepan Bandera was imprisoned there until October 1944, and two of his brothers died there.

On September 15 1939, August Dickman, a German Jehovah’s Witness, was publicly shot as a result of his conscientious objection to joining the armed forces. The SS had expected his death to persuade fellow Witnesses to abandon their own refusals and to show rspect for camp rules and authorities. It failed; the others enthusiastically refused to back down and begged to be martyred also. [4]

Sachsenhausen was the site of the largest counterfeiting operation ever. The Nazis forced Jewish artisans to produce forged American and British currency, as part of a plan to undermine the British and United States‘ economies, courtesy of Sicherheitsdienst (SD) chief Reinhard Heydrich. Over one billion pounds in counterfeited banknotes was recovered. The Germans introduced fake British £5, £10, £20 and £50 notes into circulation in 1943: the Bank of England never found them. Today, these notes are considered very valuable by collectors.

Many women were among the inmates of Sachsenhausen and its subcamps. According to SS files, more than 2,000 women lived in Sachsenhausen, guarded by female SS staff (Aufseherin). Camp records show that there was one male SS soldier for every ten inmates and for every ten male SS there was a woman SS. Several subcamps for women were established in Berlin, including in Neukolln.

Camp punishments could be harsh. Some would be required to assume the "Sachsenhausen salute" where a prisoner would squat with his arms outstretched in front. There was a marching strip around the perimeter of the roll call ground, where prisoners had to march over a variety of surfaces, to test military footwear; between 25 and 40 kilometres were covered each day. Prisoners assigned to the camp prison would be kept in isolation on poor rations and some would be suspended from posts by their wrists tied behind their backs (strappado). In cases such as attempted escape, there would a public hanging in front of the assembled prisoners.

With the advance of the Red Army in the spring of 1945, Sachsenhausen was prepared for evacuation. On April 20–21, the camp’s SS staff ordered 33,000 inmates on a forced march westward. Most of the prisoners were physically exhausted and thousands did not survive this death march; those who collapsed en route were shot by the SS. On April 22, 1945, the camp’s remaining 3,000 inmates, including 1,400 women were liberated by the Red Army and Polish 2nd Infantry Division of Ludowe Wojsko Polskie.

It’s estimated that 200,000 people passed thrugh Sachsenhausen concentration camp and that 100,000 died.

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