Archiv der Kategorie: Mitte

The Upper West Atlas Tower

Check out these das hotel berlin images:

The Upper West Atlas Tower
das hotel berlin
Image by ANBerlin
ENG: The "Upper West" has 33 floors and is a 119-meter high building with offices, hotel and retail-shops in a high-rise building in Berlin’s Charlottenburg district.

GER: Das "Upper West" hat 33 Etagen und ist ein 119 Meter hohes Gebäude mit Büros, Hotel und Einzelhandels in einem Hochhaus im Berliner Bezirk Charlottenburg.

Das Mercure Hotel Berlin Mitte mit der immer wieder schön anzusehenden Street Art-Verzierung. — #visitBerlin #berlin #architecturelovers #bluesky #sunnyday #travelblogger #reiseblogger #reiseblogger_de #bloggerontour #sightseeing #citytour #mercurehotel
das hotel berlin
Image by hoomygumb
via Instagram bit.ly/2q6IYFd

Nice Checkpoint Charlie Hotel Berlin Mitte photos

Check out these checkpoint charlie hotel berlin mitte images:

Holocaust exhibit #3
checkpoint charlie hotel berlin mitte
Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day" for Oct 18,2015.

The Holocaust exhibit, officially known as the “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe” (”Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas” in German), is a memorial in the center of Berlin dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. It consists of a 4.7-acre site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs, arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The slabs are 7 ft 10 in long, 3 ft 1 in wide, and they vary in height from 7.9 in to 15 ft 9.0 in. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west—at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims. Building of the exhibit began on April 1, 2003, and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II and opened to the public two days later. It is located one block south of the Brandenburg Gate.

I had never heard of the exhibit before I arrived; and because I am neither Jewish nor German, I had no idea what to expect. But I can tell you that it is one of the most somber, powerful, and moving exhibits I have ever seen. It was difficult for me to photograph — not because of any technical complexities, but because I had a difficult time keeping my hands from shaking as I took the photos.

**********************************
For the final few days of our vacation, we traveled by air from Amsterdam to Berlin — and spent about four days in the “Mitte” section of the city, quite close to what was once the dividing line between East and West Berlin; indeed, our hotel was technically in East Berlin.

We spent the first afternoon wandering around the local area, partly to see the infamous “Checkpoint Charlie” (just a few blocks from our hotel), and partly to get a sense of the buildings, the people, and the overall “look and feel” of the city. Since I spend much of my time focusing on “street photography” in New York, I did the same thing here … and aside from the German language that you’ll see on a few of the signposts, the people look much the same as they do in any other big city.

I did get a few photos of the Brandenburg Gate and the Holocaust Exhibition, and some video clips from inside the TierGarten (which I’ll upload in the next few days). I also took quite a few photos of some “street art” that was created on one of the few remaining sections of the old Berlin Wall; these two will be uploaded in the next few days.

We took a driving tour around the city one morning, including a quick circle around the old 1936 Olympic Stadium; we also had lunch in a fancy restaurant atop the old Reichstag Building, which is now (as I understand it) the home of the German legislature. But I certainly don’t feel that I saw very much of the entire city; it would be like making a whirlwind tour around a few parts of Manhattan, and then trying to claim that you’ve seen all of New York City.

As a child of the Cold War (and having been born exactly one year befor the day that Hitler committed suicide), I have always been intrigued by Berlin — and would love to go back several more times to see more of the neighborhoods, the culture, and the people. I don’t think I would ever claim to “know” Berlin in any complete sense; indeed, I don’t even feel that way about New York, after living here for 45+ years. But I could certainly learn a lot more, and I found it sufficiently interesting that I would like to learn more…

**********************************

During the first two weeks of September 2015, we took a river cruise down the Rhine River, and wrapped up the trip with a few days in Berlin. This Flickr album contains various photos from that trip …

We spent the first couple days recovering from jet-lag in Interlaken, Switzerland. This is the site of the Jungfrau and various other spectacular peaks in the Alps range — but it was so foggy that we could hardly see anything. I’ve included a couple of videos of a tram ride down the mountain, as well as some paraglider who floated down into the town park.

We then traveled to Basel, where we got on-board a Viking Cruise ship that headed north for the next several days — eventually arriving in Amsterdam, after making stops nearly every day to see ancient castles and fortresses, as well as various villages and small towns that have survived various wars, tyrants, and regimes for well over a thousand years.

From our final cruise destination in Amsterdam, we flew to Berlin — where we spent a few days at a very nice hotel that turned out to be in what was once East Berlin. Indeed, the separation between East and West Berlin, once so obvious and important, is now almost impossible for a visitor to spot. Except for some rubble, and a few small mementoes (like Checkpoint Charlie, a few blocks from our hotel), there is no obvious difference between East and West from pre-1989 days.

Wanna come?

Some cool best hotels in berlin images:

Wanna come?
best hotels in berlin
Image by Stuck in Customs
Join me for an all-expenses paid trip here to New Zealand to take photos for a week and join my photo adventure workshop! Yes, flights and all. This contest is available all around the world and anyone can win. I’ll give you three steps here and tell you how it works. And if you don’t win that one, maybe you’ll win a chance to come see Hans Zimmer in concert with me in the best seats in the house amidst 40,000 fans in Frankfurt, Germany’s Commerzbank-Arena. Two great prizes there, both celebrating these 10 Photo Walks I’m doing across Europe in 10 great cities. Join me for these free events!

What do you do to enter?

First, if you think any of this sounds cool, tell your friends! We have more about the photo contest at 80stays.treyratcliff.com/

Second, on that site, you can see links to all the contests and more along the top! I said two great prizes… not quite accurate as there are actually more!

Third, and this is not a requirement, but a fun thing – if you’re in the area, RSVP to one of our free photo walks coming up in Europe. You’ll also see links to all 10 events at the site above.

Good luck, and I hope you win! You’ll be on a shiny new Air New Zealand bird, heading here to Queenstown for a week of some of the most insanely beautiful scenery in the world. I’ll show you all my secret spots and you’ll have a great time at our workshop… stay in a beautiful hotel, have great food and wine, take photo walks all through the southern alps, and meet my dog Blueberry (a real highlight hehe!). Anyway, I’m packing my bags now to come to Europe for 40 days for these photo walks (spending 4 days in each city as our bus of merry traveling artists weave our way from Lisbon to Barcelona to Milan to Paris to London to Amsterdam to Berlin to Vienna to Budapest, then jumping on a plane to end the tour in Moscow) – sound exhausting eh? Okay gonna take a nap now while my camera batteries charge.

See you all soon, and best of luck again on the contest. We thought it would be a fun way to get the whole world involved even if you can join me in Europe.

#80Stays #rcmemories #AirNZ #InterFlixContest

Sunflower man
best hotels in berlin
Image by Ed Yourdon
As our cruise ship proceeded along the Rhine, we stopped for a day in Heidelberg — one of the oldest university towns in Germany, and all of Europe.

I decided to go along on the tour with the rest of the group on this particular morning — even though it was foggy and raining, and there wasn’t much opportunity to wander around. After seeing several parts of the old campus, we were taken back down to the town square and given an hour to amuse ourselves in the rain.

As usual, I wandered about and took some photos…

The man holding this umbrella turned out to be one the passengers on my cruise ship … but whenever I saw him on the ship, he seemed so grumpy that I decided not to tell him that I had photographed him. In fairness, I saw him mostly in the dining area, and perhaps he was just hungry and concentrating on his food … in any case, I did tell his niece, who seemed pleased but did not seem to have any interest in having the photo sent to her. C’est la vie …

Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day for Oct 14, 2015.

**********************************

During the first two weeks of September 2015, we took a river cruise down the Rhine River, and wrapped up the trip with a few days in Berlin. This Flickr album contains various photos from that trip …

We spent the first couple days recovering from jet-lag in Interlaken, Switzerland. This is the site of the Jungfrau and various other spectacular peaks in the Alps range — but it was so foggy that we could hardly see anything. I’ve included a couple of videos of a tram ride down the mountain, as well as some paraglider who floated down into the town park.

We then traveled to Bern, where we got on-board a Viking Cruise ship that headed north for the next several days — eventually arriving in Amsterdam, after making stops nearly every day to see ancient castles and fortresses, as well as various villages and small towns that have survived various wars, tyrants, and regimes for well over a thousand years.

From our final cruise destination in Amsterdam, we flew to Berlin — where we spent a few days at a very nice hotel that turned out to be in what was once East Berlin. Indeed, the separation between East and West Berlin, once so obvious and important, is now almost impossible for a visitor to spot. Except for some rubble, and a few small mementoes (like Checkpoint Charlie, a few blocks from our hotel), there is no obvious difference between East and West from pre-1989 days.

Oper

Some cool plaza hotel berlin images:

Oper
plaza hotel berlin
Image by Wolfgang Staudt
Get here a large view!

1880 wurde das neue, von Richard Lucae erbaute Opernhaus am ehemaligen Bockenheimer Tor eröffnet, der seitdem Opernplatz heißt. Das Gebäude ist heute unter dem Namen Alte Oper bundesweit bekannt. Die Oper wurde mit einem für die damalige Zeit sehr hohen Aufwand von 6,8 Millionen Mark errichtet, von denen etwa 1,4 Millionen aus Spendengeldern Frankfurter Bürger und dem Verkauf städtischer Grundstücke am Opernplatz stammten. Die veranschlagten Baukosten hatten 2 Millionen betragen. Die großzügige Überziehung des Budgets zu Lasten der öffentlichen Kasse sorgte für erhebliche Kritik. Der Schmerz der sparsamen Frankfurter wurde jedoch gelindert durch die feierliche Eröffnung in Gegenwart des Kaisers Wilhelm I., der dabei gesagt haben soll: Das könnte ich mir in Berlin nicht leisten.

Bis 1900 wurde das neue Haus von Generalintendant Emil Claar geleitet. 1900 legte er die Leitung der Oper nieder, um sich ganz auf das Schauspiel Frankfurt und den Neubau des Schauspielhauses zu konzentrieren. Zu seinem Nachfolger als Opernintendant wurde Paul Jensen aus Dresden berufen, der die Oper bis 1911 leitete. 1912 bis 1917 war Robert Volkner Intendant der Oper, der zuvor Direktor der Vereinigten Stadttheater in Leipzig gewesen war.

Die musikalische Leitung der Oper lag zunächst in den Händen des Ersten Kapellmeisters Felix Otto Dessoff, der das neue Haus am 20. Oktober 1880 mit einer Aufführung des Don Giovanni eröffnete. Bereits in seiner zweiten Spielzeit 1881/82 geriet das Haus in ein Defizit, das durch eine jährliche Subvention von 80.000 Mark ausgeglichen wurde. Nach 1887 musste die Stadt die Subvention sogar auf 150.000 Mark pro Jahr erhöhen. Seitdem ist die Oper Frankfurt immer auf Zuschüsse aus den öffentlichen Haushalten angewiesen gewesen, auch wenn sie noch bis nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg in der Rechtsform einer Aktiengesellschaft organisiert war

Nach Dessoffs plötzlichem Tod 1892 wurde auf Vermittlung von Johannes Brahms Ludwig Rottenberg sein Nachfolger. Er leitete das Haus bis 1924. In dieser Zeit wurden zahlreiche zeitgenössische Werke von Hans Pfitzner, Claude Debussy, Richard Strauss, Leoš Janáček, Béla Bartók und Paul Hindemith aufgeführt wurde. Zu den herausragenden Sängern dieser Zeit gehörten Else Gentner-Fischer (1907 bis 1935), Frieda Hempel (1907 bis 1912), Robert Hutt und der Bariton Robert vom Scheidt. 1908 bis 1911 kam alljährlich Enrico Caruso zu Gastspielen nach Frankfurt.

1917 wurde die Leitung der Städtischen Bühnen erstmals seit der Ära Claar wieder unter einem Generalintendanten zusammengeführt. Karl Zeiß, der zuvor das Königliche Hofschauspiel in Dresden geleitet hatte, blieb allerdings nur drei Jahre in Frankfurt. 1920 wurde er an das Staatstheater München berufen. Neuer Opernintendant wurde der gebürtige Wiener Ernst Lert, der zuvor in Basel gewirkt hatte.

1916 bis 1924 gehörte Paul Hindemith als Konzertmeister zum Frankfurter Opernhaus- und Museumsorchester.

1924 endete nach fast 32 Jahren die Ära des Ersten Kapellmeisters Ludwig Rottenberg. Mit Clemens Krauss übernahm 1924 bis 1929 erstmals ein Generalmusikdirektor auch die künstlerische Leitung der Oper. Bekannte Ensemblemitglieder während der Weimarer Republik waren der Tenor Franz Völker und die Altistin Magda Spiegel. Einen Schwerpunkt des Repertoires bildete das Werk von Franz Schreker, von dem bis 1924 vier Opern in Frankfurt uraufgeführt wurden. Ein bekannter Bühnenbildner dieser Zeit war Ludwig Sievert.

Als Clemens Krauss die Oper verließ, wurde die Leitung der Oper wieder aufgeteilt. Neuer Intendant wurde Josef Turnau aus Wien, Erster Kapellmeister Hans Wilhelm Steinberg aus Köln. Beide wurden als Juden im März 1933 von den Nationalsozialisten sofort nach der Machtergreifung aus dem Amt vertrieben.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nice Zug Hotel Berlin photos

Some cool zug hotel berlin images:

Bad Saarow
zug hotel berlin
Image by Wolfgang Staudt
Get here a large view!

Bad Saarow ist eine Gemeinde im Landkreis Oder-Spree im Bundesland Brandenburg. Sie ist Verwaltungssitz des Amtes Scharmützelsee, dem weitere vier Gemeinden angehören.

Bekannt ist der Ort für seine heilende Thermalquelle und den mineralreichen Schlamm, der schon am Anfang der Geschichte des Ortes um 1900 zur Kurierung von Hautkrankheiten diente. Seit 1923 trägt Saarow den amtlichen Titel „Bad“. 1998 wurde eine neue Therme eröffnet.

Bad Saarow ist ein Thermalsole- und Moorheilbad am Scharmützelsee. Es liegt etwa 70 km südöstlich von Berlin. Bad Saarow ist noch gekennzeichnet von seinen waldreichen und parkähnlichen Grundstücken der Gründerjahre der Villenkolonie (ab 1906).

Zwischenzeitlich hieß der Ort Bad Saarow-Pieskow, was im Zuge der Gemeindegebietsreform geändert wurde. Pieskow ist der ältere Ortsteil von Bad Saarow; Therme und Bahnhof liegen in dieser Gemarkung.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Großglockner
zug hotel berlin
Image by pittigliani2005
fotografiert am 5. Juni 2003 am Großglockner

===============================

"Der Weg über das Hochtor ist eine alte „Römerstraße“, ein Säumerweg, der schon in der Hallstattzeit laut vorkeltischen Funden benutzt wurde, und noch im 17. Jahrhundert der drittwichtigste Alpenübergang nach Brenner und Radstädter Tauern war. Die Hauptroute verlief aber nie vorrangig in die abgelegene Fusch, sondern über das Seidlwinkeltal und – seit dem Hochmittelalter – das Rauriser Tauernhaus in die Rauris mit ihren reichen Goldfunden, und von dort ins Pongauer Salzachtal.[3]

In Zeiten der Monarchie war das Glocknergebiet noch Jagdrevier des Kaisers, und als Ausgangsbasis bestand auf der Südseite seit 1834 eine Unterkunftshütte in der Gamsgrube und seit 1875 das Glocknerhaus, das seit 1908 mit der Kutsche erreichbar war.

In den 1920er Jahren wurden in der Tages- und Fachpresse viele mehr oder weniger aussichtsreiche Vorhaben erörtert, die Alpen für den touristischen Verkehr zu erschließen. Dazu gehörten etwa die Wiener Höhenstraße oder die geplante, aber nie gebaute Wienerwaldbahn ins Tullnerfeld. Ursprünglichen Planungen in Kärnten und Salzburg im Juni 1924 zufolge sollte eine „Großglockner-Hochalpenstraße“ zwischen Heiligenblut und Ferleiten als private Mautstraße errichtet werden. Der in Kärntner Landesdiensten stehende Ingenieur Franz Wallack (1887–1966) wurde mit der Erstellung eines generellen Projekts für die Strecke und für mehrere Berghotels beauftragt. Nach diesem wurde auch das Wallackhaus, ein direkt an der Hochalpenstraße gelegenes Hotel, benannt.

Dieses Projekt hatte insofern eine besondere Bedeutung, als dass Südtirol mit dem Friedensvertrag von St. Germain von Österreich abgetrennt war und die ehemalige innerösterreichische Verbindung von Kärnten nach Nordtirol über den Brennerpass verloren war. Da es auf den 156 Kilometern zwischen dem Radstädter Tauernpass und dem Brennerpass keine Straße über die Hauptalpenkette gab, waren Oberkärnten und Osttirol vom direkten Straßenverkehr mit den Bundesländern am Nordrand der Alpen abgeschnitten, so dass bereits im Sommer 1922 das damalige Büro für Fremdenverkehr im Bundesministerium für Handel, Industrie und Bauten den Bau einer Straße vorschlug. Allerdings verebbten aus Geldmangel und wegen geschwundener Erfolgserwartungen die Aktivitäten bis zum Ende der 1920er Jahre.

Sie verschoben sich schließlich nach Salzburg, wo Landeshauptmann Franz Rehrl sich dafür einsetzte. Rehrl war als kühner und leidenschaftlicher Automobilist bekannt und machte die Realisierung der Straße zu seinem persönlichen Ziel. 1928/29 verknüpfte er die Glocknerstraße mit einem überdimensionierten Tauernkraftwerksprojekt der AEG Berlin, die dadurch als Aktionärin der Großglockner-Hochalpenstraßen Aktiengesellschaft (GROHAG) einsprang, nach Scheitern der Kraftwerkspläne jedoch 1931 wieder ausstieg. Nur ein Sondergesetz zur Finanzierung der Fertigstellung der 1930 begonnenen Bauabschnitte konnte eine internationale Blamage abwenden. Ende 1932 konnte die Nordrampe und die Gletscherstraße zur Pasterze dann feierlich der Öffentlichkeit übergeben werden. Allerdings belasteten die Kosten von 6 Millionen Schilling die Republik in einer Zeit schwerster Depression – die GROHAG musste liquidiert werden.

Mit der Machtübernahme der diktatorischen Regierung Dollfuß im März 1933 folgte eine autofreundliche Wende der österreichischen Wirtschaftspolitik mit Blick auf die Erfolge der NS-Motorisierungspolitik im Nachbarland. Im Zentrum standen

* ein groß angelegtes Straßenbauprogramm
* Arbeitsbeschaffung, das heißt, Verringerung der Arbeitslosigkeit durch
* Wiederbelebung des Großglocknerstraßen-Projektes nur wenige Monate nach Liquidation der GROHAG – in den Jahren 1930–1935 wurden 14 % der gesamten Straßenbauausgaben auf die Glocknerstraße konzentriert
* Förderung automobilsportlicher Veranstaltungen
* Steuerliche Vergünstigungen wie etwa die Abschaffung der Kraftwagenabgabe 1935, was zu einem Autoboom führte.

Am 3. August 1935 wurde die Großglockner-Hochalpenstraße nach fünfjähriger Bauzeit eröffnet. Insgesamt waren 3200 Arbeiter in den Bau involviert. Nur einen Tag später fand der Große Bergpreis von Österreich für Automobile und Motorräder statt.

Im Zuge von Arbeitsbeschaffungsmaßnahmen wurde ab 1937 auch die südliche Zufahrtsstraße zwischen Heiligenblut und Dölsach zu einer modernen Autostraße ausgebaut." Quelle und weitere Informationen: Wikipedia: Großglockner-Hochalpenstraße / Geschichte

===============================

Weiterführende Links:
Homepage: www.grossglockner.at/hochalpenstrasse/strassenprofil.htm
45info: de.45info.com/video/Gro%c3%9fglockner
eyeplorer: de.eyeplorer.com/show/me/Gro%c3%9fglockner

Nice Circus Hotel Berlin photos

A few nice circus hotel berlin images I found:

Courtyard at the Circus Hotel, Berlin
circus hotel berlin
Image by heatheronhertravels
www.circus-berlin.de/

Read my review of Circus Hotel on my travel blog
http://www.heatheronhertravels.com/budget-boutique-bliss-at-circus-hotel-in-berlin/

This photo is licenced under Creative commons for use including commercial on condition that you link back to or credit http://www.heatheronhertravels.com/.

See my profile for more detail.

Circus Rogale
circus hotel berlin
Image by sparkle-motion
A very, very creepy looking circus was setting up beside our hotel. Josh has the pictures of it during the day. This is proof that it didn’t get any better at night.

Circus Hotel, Rosenplatz U-bahn, #Berlin
circus hotel berlin
Image by mr brown