Archiv der Kategorie: Mitte

Cool Hotels In Berlin Brandenburger Tor images

A few nice hotels in berlin brandenburger tor images I found:

Berlin, Brandenburger Tor
hotels in berlin brandenburger tor
Image by Mila Schmitt
Kutschfahrten am Brandenburger Tor vor dem Adlon Hotel

Berlin – Reichstag | Blick zum Pariser Platz
hotels in berlin brandenburger tor
Image by marcjohn.de
Blick zum Pariser Platz, umzingelt vom Brandenburger Tor, der Botschaft der USA und dem Hotel Adlon.

View from the Reichstag to the Pariser Platz, surrounded by the Brandenburg Gate, Embassy of the United States an d Hotel Adlon

© 2014 by Marc Oliver John | marcjohn.de – Alle Rechte vorbehalten, Keine kommerzielle Veröffentlichung ohne Genehmigung – All rights reserved, no commercial publishing without permission.

Berlin, Germany

Some cool gay hotel berlin images:

Berlin, Germany
gay hotel berlin
Image by JasonParis
Our final night in Berlin featured a few gay bars back in the Schönenberg neighbourhood.

Image from page 79 of „Glimpses of medical Europe“ (1908)
gay hotel berlin
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: glimpsesofmedica00thom
Title: Glimpses of medical Europe
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Thompson, Ralph L. (Ralph Leroy), 1872-
Subjects: Medicine Medicine Education, Medical Travel
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J.B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
and are crowding the German universi-ties, when they can go cheaply, to overflowing. Not only men but a great many women aregoing into medicine here in Russia nowadays.For some reasons they are considered superiorto the men. They do more, and they live onless. They have a way of overcoming theold medical superstitions and insinuatinghygienic ideas. The zemstvos themselves have foundedmodest schools, in addition to the Govern-ment female medical annexes, for the educa-tion of women physicians and surgeons. Sothat now these women, who seem to possessa real longing to be of use to the people, willfind ample scope for their noble passion. 71 MEDICAL EUROPE We did not leave Russia without investi-gating the food question. We tried every-thing, and at times got stung. But ingeneral Russian food is the real thing. Onehas never drunk tea till one has tried it inRussia, and the caviare as one gets it here issomething to live for. Caviare is the onething in St. Petersburg that is comparatively

Text Appearing After Image:
Monument to Pf.tkr the Great cheap, and we nearly ruined our gastricmucosa with it in trying to get square forother deals. There is an interesting restau-rant here, where one is given a net and isallowed to scoop up from a big tank in thecentre of the room the fish he desires to beserved with. As St. Petersburg is a wintercity, we did not see it at its best, when it isfilled with the gayest society in all Europe.But it is away from St. Petersburg after a 72 ST. PETERSBURG hard clays travel one really enjoys the food.The national dish of Russia is cabbage soup.It is made of sour cabbage and water (empty^ shtshV). With fresh fat beef and clottedcream added (smietciJia) it is a dish for kings.A bowl of this soup, a dish of buckwheat,baked porridge, and a pot of tea from thesmoking samovar, which is found in everyhousehold in Russia from Tsar to mujik, isbetter than all the dinners the big hotels ofthe cities can supply. VII. BERLIN ANGLO-AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIA-TION TYPES OF AMERICAN ST

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Upon Reflection

Some cool hotels in berlin am alexanderplatz images:

Upon Reflection
hotels in berlin am alexanderplatz
Image by Fraser Mummery
The Berlin T.V. Tower observation deck reflected in the windows of the Park Inn hotel in Alexanderplatz.

The Berlin T.V. Tower (Fernsehturm Berlin) was constructed between 1965 and 1969 by the administration of the German Democratic Republic. It was intended as a symbol of Berlin as it is easily visible throughout the central and some suburban districts of Berlin. With its height of 368 meters, it is the tallest structure in Germany.

Due to its location near Alexanderplatz, the tower is occasionally called Alex Tower.

Taken in the Alexanderplatz district, Berlin, Germany.

From Deutsche Technikmuseum, Berlin
hotels in berlin am alexanderplatz
Image by hillman54
View from the terrace of the Deutsche Technikmuseum. From Posdamerplatz to Alexanderplatz.

Pencil, pen and watercolours. Moleskine watercolour booklet. 200 g cold-pressed paper. Size (inches): 5 ½” x 3½”; (cm): 9X14

My drawing was published on Wimdu, Europe’s biggest peer-to-peer property rental platform for short-stays, holidays and weekend breaks. With headquarters in Berlin, the company offers affordable and quality properties in many cities around the world. Wimdu leads the way in providing accommodation that is the perfect substitute for hotel stays.

www.wimdu.com/blog/six-top-places-in-berlin-locals-like-t…

è stato pubblicato anche su

bonvivants.de/2013/04/12/moleskine-notizbuch-das-erbe-des…

Nice A Und O Hotel Berlin Mitte photos

Some cool a und o hotel berlin mitte images:

Limousine
a und o hotel berlin mitte
Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura
Não sei se era alguma celebridade, alguém rico, ou apenas alguém esbanjando.

Na divisa entre as extintas Berlim Oriental e Berlim Ocidental, localizado na Praça de Paris ou "Pariserplatz", em alemão, o Portão de Brandemburgo foi o símbolo da divisão da cidade. Desde a queda do Muro de Berlim, ele se tornou o símbolo da Berlim reunificada. A Pariser Platz, que foi uma área desolada, hoje está totalmente reestruturada e recuperou a sua grandeza peculiar do século XIX.

O Portão de Brandemburgo foi projetado por Carl Gotthard Langhans. Ele foi construído entre 1778 e 1791. A decoração, incluindo as figuras da mitologia grega, levou outros 4 anos para ser concluída. A quadriga da vitória (carro puxado por quatro cavalos, peculiar de figuras mitológicas) sobre o portão foi construída em 1793 por Johann Gottfried Schadow. Originalmente ela era um símbolo de paz.

Durante a ocupação de Berlim pela França, em 1806, Napoleão Bonaparte ordenou que a quadriga fosse levada para Paris. Após a Batalha de Waterloo (1815), a quadriga foi triunfantemente recuperada e levada de volta para Berlim, e se tornou um símbolo de vitória.
Wikipédia

Pariser Platz is the square immediately behind the Brandenburg Gate when approaching the centre of Berlin from the Tiergarten in the west. The neo-classical Brandenburg Gate was completed in the early 1790s by Carl Gotthard Langhans. Until 1814 the square was known simply as Viereck (the Square). In March 1814, when Prussian troops along with the other Allies captured Paris after the overthrow of Napoleon, it was renamed Pariser Platz to mark this triumph.

The Brandenburg Gate was the main gate in the western side of the customs wall that surrounded the city in the eighteenth century, and the Pariser Platz is at the west end of the avenue of Unter den Linden, the ceremonial axis of the city, down which the victorious troops of all regimes from the Hohenzollerns to the German Democratic Republic have marched in triumph.

Before World War II, Pariser Platz was the grandest square in Berlin, flanked by the American and French embassies, the finest hotel (the Adlon Hotel), the Academy of the Arts, and several blocks of apartments and offices.

During the last years of World War II, all of the buildings around the square were turned to rubble by air raids and heavy artillery bombardment. The only structure left standing in the ruins of Pariser Platz was the Brandenburg Gate, which was restored by the East Berlin and West Berlin governments. After the war and especially with the construction of the Berlin Wall, the square was laid waste and became part of the death zone dividing the city.

When the city was reunited in 1990, there was broad consensus that the Pariser Platz should be made into a fine urban space again. The embassies would move back, the hotel and arts academy would be reinstated, and prestigious firms would be encouraged to build round the square. Under the rules of reconstruction, eaves heights had to be 22 meters, and buildings had to have a proper termination against the sky. Stone cladding was to be used as far as possible. Interpretations of these constraints, however, have varied to a great extent.
Wikipedia

Der Pariser Platz ist ein rund 1½ Hektar großer quadratischer Platz in der Dorotheenstadt im Berliner Ortsteil Mitte.

An der Ostseite des Brandenburger Tors gelegen, bildet er den Abschluss des Boulevards Unter den Linden sowie das Pendant zum Platz des 18. März auf der anderen Seite des Tores. Dort endet die den Tiergarten durchquerende Straße des 17. Juni.

Von 1945 bis zur deutschen Wiedervereinigung lag der Pariser Platz in unmittelbarer Nähe der Sektorengrenze zwischen Ost- und West-Berlin und war seit dem Mauerbau im Jahr 1961 Teil des Todesstreifens. Seit der Wende 1989 ist der ehemals gesperrte Platz wieder für Fußgänger frei zugänglich. Die Berliner bezeichnen den Platz auch als die „Gute Stube Berlins“.
WIkipedia

Cool Business Hotel Berlin images

Some cool business hotel berlin images:

Lisa Maree
business hotel berlin
Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week; Cruise Bar hosts famous fashion event; MBFWA business wheels in motion

Cruise Bar Hosts Fashion Week…

When it comes to style the Cruise Bar and Restaurant is a perfect host partner for the prestigious Mercedes-Benz Australian Fashion Week.

For the first time in many years, Cruise Restaurant is open to the public everyday of fashion week for lunch and dinner.

Fashion Week is Sydney’s premier fashion and lifestyle event showcasing some of our most talented and contemporary designers.

The beautiful waterfront location of Cruise Bar in Circular Quay is an ideal location to enjoy gourmet food, decadent wines and delicious cocktails while enjoying the cultural surrounds that is Fashion week.

For more information visit their official website.

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week: Business, fashion, beauty, deals and gossip…

Sydney will be enjoying a bevy of catwalk shows and party like events as Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia commences tomorrow. But unlike the increasing number of fashion festivals across the country where people can buy tickets to events, MBFWA is invitation only.

Today was media registration day, which was quite an event in its own right.

Over five days, fashion designers show their latest collections to media reps, celebrities and retail buyers, and the response can be paramount to the bottom line.

This year happens to mark Mercedes-Benz’s return to Fashion Week as the title sponsor, which many media and fashion commentators have welcomed.

“The strong link between Mercedes-Benz and fashion was initiated in Australia with the launch of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in 1995, so it’s come full circle,” advised Mercedes-Benz senior manager of corporate communications David McCarthy.

The car maker’s Fashion Week events have spread around the world to places such as New York and Berlin, and to Swim Fashion Week in Miami.

The Mercedes-Benz’s sponsorship deal was not exactly a secret last year as Rosemount’s (wine) five-year run came to an end. The new deal is understood to be valued at million over three years but McCarthy says the details are confidential.

MBFWA comes with a many change. A key change from the festival organisers is that IMG Fashion have reduced the price of on-site venue fees. A trend over the past few years.

This year, it set back exhibitors ,250 to use the newly returned Tent at the Overseas Passenger Terminal as a catwalk venue, 00 to be a part of Fashion Week but show off-site and between 00 and 00 to showcase collections at The Rocks Pop-Up suites.

Two of the festival’s biggest names, Josh Goot and Dion Lee, pulled out a fortnight before their respective shows. The designers who have fallen by the wayside in the lead-up to the five-day event have either opted to concentrate on upcoming overseas shows (Lee), to focus on getting collections out to coincide with northern hemisphere seasons (Goot) or have chosen to disregard Fashion Week from the get-go, with Fairfax Media pointing to Alex Perry as the example.

For Melbourne Business School associate professor of marketing Mark Ritson, having Australian designers drop out is a “tricky” scenario.

“On the one hand, you have to respect any Australian designer focused on building their reputation overseas,” he says. “We are perilously under-represented in Paris and Milan.

“But at the same time, a designer has to be careful of burning branding bridges back home. That said, if Goot or Lee make it in Europe they’ll be welcomed back home in 2013 with open arms.”

Fashion Week is serious business. Alongside Mercedes-Benz, sponsors that have signed on this year include DHL, EYE, HP, Maybelline NY, Redken, Shangri-La Hotel Sydney, Pentax, Keystone Hospitality and Getty Images.

The NSW government, Destination NSW and Austrade are also supporting the event.

In addition, designers are obtaining their own sponsorships. Jayson Brunsdon’s show, for instance, is being presented by Myer and sponsored by Qantas, Woolmark, TRESemme, MAC Cosmetics and Joh Bailey.

Couture designer Johanna Johnson is the virgin Australian designer to showcase her collection at the prestigious Mercedes-Benz Presents show, which has previously featured big fashion names such as Herve Leger by Max Azria, Carolina Herrera and Badgley Mischka.

“To do [the Presents show] during our first year back was a priority,” McCarthy says.

Johnson recently found international success, with Hollywood actresses Christina Hendricks and Maya Rudolph wearing her feminine creations on the red carpet.

The show will have the same feel – glamour, lots of hand-beading and detailed finishes.

“I hadn’t really considered doing it and was focusing more on overseas expansion this year,” Johnson says.

“But we’re having so much feedback from Australians wanting to know more now, it will be really good to showcase our luxury lifestyle line and red carpet ready-to-wear.”

She initially signed on to show in the smallest of the three catwalk venues, the Box, but had to move the show to the Tent (the biggest) as the number of outfits she wanted to parade expanded.

“It’s our debut show so we want it done as well as it possibly can be,” she says.

Australian accessories giant Oroton is launching its first ready-to-wear collection. But for creative director Ana Maria Escobar, the clothes are there to show off the accessories – be they handbags, jewellery or shoes.

“The biggest thing is when I walked into the stores, I saw they needed something soft to highlight the accessories,” she says.

Customers can expect “understated quality” from the new Oroton clothing range.

“To me, functionality is important,” Escobar says.

“So are the materials . . . it can be a simple singlet but made out of really beautiful silk or customised fabrics. There’s a tone of heritage as well.”

While Oroton views Fashion Week as important, Escobar says there is also “life beyond those 15 minutes on the catwalk”.

For the retailer, it’s about reminding people of the brand.

“We want to talk a little louder about the product we design,” she says. “Fashion Week gives us that space without having to scream.”

This year, a great spread of overseas buyers will be in attendance, many from online retailers such as Net-A-Porter, My Wardrobe, Shopbop, Moda Operandi and ASOS. Department store Harvey Nichols and Hong Kong-based Joyce will also have buyers present.

The retail picture in Australia is not particularly strong, and IBISWorld analysts are predicting growth for the local rag trade over the coming financial year will be flat at just 0.5 per cent.

IBISWorld general manager Karen Dobie says the high Australian dollar is a double-edged sword for retailers, as local vendors can buy overseas at a favourable rate, but increasingly tech-savvy competition is straining profit margins.

New to MBFWA: Dylan Cooper; Flowers for a Vagabond; Toi et Moi Sydney; By Johnny; Oroton; Watson x Watson; An Ode to No One; Jenny Kee; Aje; Roppa Pemmaraju; Bless’d Are The Meek and Nana Judy

Not present this year: Dion Lee; Josh Goot; Alex Perry; Arnsdorf; Morrison; Friend of Mine; Flannel; Karla Spetic; Lover; Therese Rawsthorne; Ms Couture; Rachel Gilbert; Little Joe Woman (voluntary administration); Nookie; Amber & Thomas; Marnie Skillings; Kate Sylvester; Shakuhachi; Bianca Spender; Dhini; Camilla & Marc; White Suede; Yeojin Bae; Lisa Blue; Limedrop; Stolen Girlfriends Club; Alistair Trung; Saint Augustine Academy (which shut up shop late last year)

Returning to the show: Romance Was Born; Camilla; Aurelio Costarella; Ksubi; Jayson Brunsdon; Akira

Camilla…

Since launching her label eight years ago, Camilla Franks continues to receive global recognition as an Australian designer who has a unique approach to creating colorful, playful and luxurious lifestyle fashion.

Her unique ready-to-wear and resort wear designs are becoming highly sought after products, capturing the attentions of celebrities and fashionistas alike. Camilla’s global fan club (which includes the likes of Beyonce Knowles, Miranda Kerr, Kate Hudson, Lily Allen and Gwen Stefani) reached new heights 2 years ago when the queen of television, Oprah Winfrey, glowed in one of her designs while taping her ‘down under’ series. The general public and the fashion world gushed and stock sold out overnight. Camilla is definitely a brand on the move.

So, how did Camilla Franks become one of Australia’s most iconic fashion designers? This iconic brand came to be whilst Camilla was exploring her passions for theatrical artistry. Here, she embraced her inner creative spirit to craft beautiful elaborate costumes for the various characters in her productions. It wasn’t long before the Australian fashion market caught eye of these imaginative, easy-to-wear designs and catapulted Camilla on this amazing journey.

Today, Camilla has evolved from beach and resort fashion into ready-to-wear clothes that cater to all her client’s needs. Globally, Camilla has begun weaving into the various fashion niches, resulting in a kaleidoscope of high-end editorial and extending an already growing customer database.
Over eight years, Camilla has produced nine collections: these include the highly anticipated 2011/12’s Spring Summer Collection, Labyrinth; which has received significant media attention and 2012’s Autumn Winter Collection Caravanserai, Camilla’s second winter season. The success of her brand is derived from Camilla’s philosophy that “all women have the right to look and feel beautiful no matter their age, colour, size or origin”, this is also a testament to the company’s popularity and growing awareness.

Camilla is a brand that celebrates women, self-expression, beauty and individuality. The signature ‘Camilla’ piece is a statement of brilliant colour, graphics and material rhythm. It is a celebration of shapes that can be tailored to individual styles and that follow global trends.

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia Announces Preliminary Line-up…

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia Announces Preliminary Line-upfor Spring/Summer 2012/13 Collections

Sydney, Australia (February 29, 2012) Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia is excited to announce cult label Ksubi, celebrity favourite Camilla, Zimmermann, Lisa Ho, Toni Maticevski, Aurelio Costarella, Jayson Brunsdon, Ellery, and Carl Kapp will be amongst the line-up of designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2012/13 Collections at Sydney’s Overseas Passenger Terminal, April 30 to May 4, 2012.

"MBFWA is a fantastic opportunity for emerging Australian designers to join already well established designers in showcasing their creations not just in venues that people expect but in venues and spaces that will reflect the diversity and vibrancy of the Australian fashion scene. The shows, presentations and locations demonstrate that MBFWA has a flavour and style that can more than hold its own around the world" says Gavin Allen, General Marketing, Mercedes-Benz Australia/Pacific.

A stand out on the 2012 schedule is expected to be Romance was Born. The label is showcasing their polished ready to wear collection combining art and wearable fashion in a sophisticated Spring Summer range. Johanna Johnson will also attract hype as she hosts an intimate salon show for her debut at MBFWA. Mixing old Hollywood charm and modern simplicity, Johnson is renowned for her recent Oscar’s role dressing starlets in her eponymous label.

Iconic Australian brand, Oroton will also debut on the runway at MBFWA for the first time demonstrating the brand is as skilled at creating Ready to Wear women’s wear as well as their well known luxury accessories.

Joining this incredible line up of iconic designers are Magdalena Velevska, Alice McCall, Lisa Maree, Gary Bigeni, Bec and Bridge, Miss Unkon, Bowie, Kooey Australia, Michael Lo Sordo, Kirrily Johnston and Talulah.

New talent showcasing for the first time, Watson x Watson are sure to excite international buyers and media with their collections, providing new ‘ones to watch’ for our global audience. Watson x Watson focus on everyday luxury and easy glamour, with a relaxed, sexy appeal that has become synonymous with Australian fashion.

Other newcomers joining the MBFWA family: We are Handsome, Aje, Elliot Ward Fear, Roopa Pemmaraju, Flowers for a Vagabond, Suboo, An Ode to No One and Project Runway Australia winner Dylan Cooper and alumni by Johnny. Designers involved in the 2012 New Generation, Fashion Design Studio and Raffles emerging talent shows will be announced shortly.

“We’re extremely excited by the response from designers and brands and are looking forward to showcasing the new seasons Spring Summer Collections in our world class facilities on site as well as sharing more of the city of Sydney’s wonderfully unique locations with our expanded off site program of shows and presentations’” says Jarrad Clark, Global Production Director, IMG Fashion.

Leveraging our global network, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia is introducing new showroom spaces, exciting venue upgrades and unique presentation spaces to ensure our line up of designers have innovative way to communicate their artistic vision for 2012.

For the first time on Australian soil, many designers will showcase their collections via a studio style presentation space known as The Box. Having established itself at MBFW in NY and Berlin, designers are redefining how they showcase their collections using this blank canvas. Australian designer Dion Lee recently used a presentation style space to showcase his collection at London Fashion Week and wowed crowds with his use of lighting to create drama and engagement around his collection without the confines of the runway.

2012 will also see the much anticipated return of The Tent. Synonymous with international fashion events, the sheer scale of The Tent showroom set on the Sydney harbour foreshore will create an incredible billboard for MBFWA and the Australian Fashion Industry for our attending local and international guests.

Key buyers will have the opportunity to get up close with designer collections during the week via a unique offering of Designer Showrooms via The Rocks Pop-Up Suites, utilising retail spaces within The Rocks historical precinct, designers will be able to house their collections off runway, and meet buyers and media in one on one appointments. It is here that designers are encouraged to create consumer offerings around the Fashion Week schedule to create more retail opportunities for our participating designer brands.

MBFWA hosts the world’s most influential buyers, media and industry players during the 5 day event and bring Sydney city to life with Fashion Week fever. With the support of our official partners, and showcasing designers, the 2012 season will be a standout year showcasing the creative energy and raw talent that Australia has to offer.

Title sponsor Mercedes-Benz is proudly supported by Government partners Destination NSW and Austrade, Maybelline New York, DHL, HP/Intel, Redken 5th Avenue NYC and EYE and as well as media outlet Getty Images. Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia is an IMG event.
The Spring Summer 2012/13 Collections will take place April 30 to May 4, 2012, Press and Industry Registration opens March 1, 2012.

For more information please visit us online at mbfashionweek.com
Follow us on Twitter @MBFWA and on the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Facebook

Websites

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week (Australia)
australia.mbfashionweek.com

IMG Worldwide
www.imgworld.com

Cruise Bar
www.cruisebar.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr
www.flickr.com/evarinaldiphotography

Eva Rinaldi Photography
www.evarinaldi.com

Business hotel@berlin
business hotel berlin
Image by Christian Steen
Wallstreet Plaza

Business hotel@berlin
business hotel berlin
Image by Christian Steen
Wallstreet Plaza

Nice Berlin Mitte Wohnung photos

Some cool berlin mitte wohnung images:

Mietshaus Arnheim
berlin mitte wohnung
Image by Gertrud K.
Badstraße, Berlin Gesundbrunnen (Mitte)

1892-93 von Wilhelm Martens als Wohnhaus für Arbeiter und Angestellte der Tresorfabrik S. J. Arnheim errichtet. Das Wohnhaus unterscheidet sich deutlich von den gewöhnlichen Mietshäusern des ausgehenden 19. Jahrhunderts. Da Hintergebäude fehlen, erhalten auch die rückwärtigen Wohnungen ausreichend Licht. Die Straßenfassade besitzt nicht den üblichen Stuckdekor, sondern folgt mit einer roten Backsteinverkleidung, mit Segmentbogenfenstern, mit Friesen und Ornamenten aus grünschwarz glasierten Klinkern der Backsteinbaukunst der Berliner Bauakademie. Risalite betonen den hervortretenden Mitteltrakt. Die in das hohe Satteldach hineinragenden Giebel sind ebenso wie der Haupteingang mit gotisierenden Blenden und Zinnen verziert. Dieser Bauschmuck orientiert sich an der märkischen Backsteingotik. Am südlichen Giebel erinnert eine alte Werbeschrift an die Geldschrankfabrik S. J. Arnheim. Das Wohnhaus wurde 1987-92 vorbildlich restauriert.

Pfarrhaus St. Petri
berlin mitte wohnung
Image by Gertrud K.
Friedrichsgracht, Berlin Mitte

Das fünfgeschossige Pfarrhaus St. Petri, Friedrichsgracht 53-55, ließ die Gemeinde 1885-86 als Rohziegelbau mit Sandsteingliederung anstelle von drei Wohnhäusern errichten. Es ist das letzte authentische Haus, das von der Bebauung der Friedrichsgracht erhalten blieb.

Dem unbekannten Architekten des Pfarrhauses merkt man eine Beeinflussung durch Eklektizismus und Stilvielfalt seiner Zeit an. Einen schlichten gelben Ziegelbau mit Wohnungen und Kirchenbüros schmückte er mit Baudetails – Portal, Erker, gekuppelte Fenster, Giebel und Fialen -, die an Gotik und Spätromanik erinnern, bei genauerem Hinsehen aber auch Zutaten von Renaissance und Barock offenbaren. Das in die sechsgeschossige Blockrandbebauung mit Appartementhäusern in Großplattenbauweise integrierte Pfarrhaus mit seinen Bezügen zu Petrikirche ist eines der letzten Zeugnisse des untergegangenen Alt-Kölln. (Denkmale in Berlin)

Summer holiday 2014

Some cool berlin 10115 images:

Summer holiday 2014
berlin 10115
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries‘ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

Berlin Wall

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For the chess opening variation, sometimes known as Berlin Wall, see Berlin Defence.

Page semi-protected

Berlin Wall

Berlinermauer.jpg
View from the West Berlin side of graffiti art on the wall in 1986. The wall’s "death strip", on the east side of the wall, here follows the curve of the Luisenstadt Canal (filled in 1932).

Berlin-wall-map.png
Map of the location of the Berlin Wall, showing checkpoints

General information

Type
Wall

Country
East Germany
Flag of East Berlin (1956-1990).svg East Berlin (Soviet-occupied sector of Berlin)

Coordinates
52.516111°N 13.376944°ECoordinates: 52.516111°N 13.376944°E

Construction started
13 August 1961

Dimensions

Other dimensions

Border length around West Berlin: 155 km (96 mi)
Border length between West Berlin and East Germany: 111.9 km (69.5 mi)
Border length between West and East Berlin: 43.1 km (26.8 mi)
Border length through residential areas in East Berlin: 37 km (23 mi)
Concrete segment of wall height: 3.6 m (12 ft)
Concrete segment of wall length: 106 km (66 mi)
Wire mesh fencing: 66.5 km (41.3 mi)
Anti-vehicle trenches length: 105.5 km (65.6 mi)
Contact/signal fence length: 127.5 km (79.2 mi)
Column track width: 7 m (7.7 yd)
Column track length: 124.3 km (77.2 mi)
Number of watch towers: 302
Number of bunkers: 20

Technical details

Size
155 km (96 mi)

Satellite image of Berlin, with the wall’s location marked in yellow

West and East Berlin borders overlaying a current road map (interactive map)

The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989,[1] constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off (by land) West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin until it was opened in November 1989.[2] Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and was completed in 1992. [3] The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls,[4] which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany. In practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked East Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period.

The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart" (German: Antifaschistischer Schutzwall) by GDR authorities, implying that the NATO countries and West Germany in particular were "fascists."[5] The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame"—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall’s restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border (IGB), which demarcated the border between East and West Germany, it came to symbolize the "Iron Curtain" that separated Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War.

Before the Wall’s erection, 3.5 million East Germans circumvented Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and defected from the GDR, many by crossing over the border from East Berlin into West Berlin, from where they could then travel to West Germany and other Western European countries. Between 1961 and 1989, the wall prevented almost all such emigration.[6] During this period, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with an estimated death toll of from 136[7] to more than 200[8] in and around Berlin.

In 1989, a series of radical political changes occurred in the Eastern Bloc, associated with the liberalization of the Eastern Bloc’s authoritarian systems and the erosion of political power in the pro-Soviet governments in nearby Poland and Hungary. After several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on 9 November 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, euphoric public and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of what was left. Contrary to popular belief the wall’s actual demolition did not begin until Summer 1990 and was not completed until 1992.[1] The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on 3 October 1990.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_Wall

Summer holiday 2014
berlin 10115
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries‘ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

Berlin Wall

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For the chess opening variation, sometimes known as Berlin Wall, see Berlin Defence.

Page semi-protected

Berlin Wall

Berlinermauer.jpg
View from the West Berlin side of graffiti art on the wall in 1986. The wall’s "death strip", on the east side of the wall, here follows the curve of the Luisenstadt Canal (filled in 1932).

Berlin-wall-map.png
Map of the location of the Berlin Wall, showing checkpoints

General information

Type
Wall

Country
East Germany
Flag of East Berlin (1956-1990).svg East Berlin (Soviet-occupied sector of Berlin)

Coordinates
52.516111°N 13.376944°ECoordinates: 52.516111°N 13.376944°E

Construction started
13 August 1961

Dimensions

Other dimensions

Border length around West Berlin: 155 km (96 mi)
Border length between West Berlin and East Germany: 111.9 km (69.5 mi)
Border length between West and East Berlin: 43.1 km (26.8 mi)
Border length through residential areas in East Berlin: 37 km (23 mi)
Concrete segment of wall height: 3.6 m (12 ft)
Concrete segment of wall length: 106 km (66 mi)
Wire mesh fencing: 66.5 km (41.3 mi)
Anti-vehicle trenches length: 105.5 km (65.6 mi)
Contact/signal fence length: 127.5 km (79.2 mi)
Column track width: 7 m (7.7 yd)
Column track length: 124.3 km (77.2 mi)
Number of watch towers: 302
Number of bunkers: 20

Technical details

Size
155 km (96 mi)

Satellite image of Berlin, with the wall’s location marked in yellow

West and East Berlin borders overlaying a current road map (interactive map)

The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989,[1] constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off (by land) West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin until it was opened in November 1989.[2] Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and was completed in 1992. [3] The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls,[4] which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the "death strip") that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany. In practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked East Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period.

The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the "Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart" (German: Antifaschistischer Schutzwall) by GDR authorities, implying that the NATO countries and West Germany in particular were "fascists."[5] The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the "Wall of Shame"—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall’s restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border (IGB), which demarcated the border between East and West Germany, it came to symbolize the "Iron Curtain" that separated Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War.

Before the Wall’s erection, 3.5 million East Germans circumvented Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and defected from the GDR, many by crossing over the border from East Berlin into West Berlin, from where they could then travel to West Germany and other Western European countries. Between 1961 and 1989, the wall prevented almost all such emigration.[6] During this period, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with an estimated death toll of from 136[7] to more than 200[8] in and around Berlin.

In 1989, a series of radical political changes occurred in the Eastern Bloc, associated with the liberalization of the Eastern Bloc’s authoritarian systems and the erosion of political power in the pro-Soviet governments in nearby Poland and Hungary. After several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on 9 November 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, euphoric public and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of what was left. Contrary to popular belief the wall’s actual demolition did not begin until Summer 1990 and was not completed until 1992.[1] The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on 3 October 1990.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_Wall